Dr. Dolittle

Sheep as models for diabetes

Insulin is a major hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar. Its main function is to lower sugar by increasing glucose uptake into muscle and fat cells. Insulin resistance is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes and occurs when tissues in the body are not able to respond to insulin resulting in sustained elevations in blood sugar,…

Hats off to all of the comparative physiologists who were recognized for their hard work and exciting research at the 2015 annual Comparative and Evolutionary Physiology Business meeting at the Experimental Biology conference earlier this month. I thought I would take a moment to recognize each awardee:              

Pretoria

I am listening Pretoria! Since there have been so many wonderful discussions led by students from the University of Pretoria over the last couple of years (refer to the comments), I thought I would recognize this wonderful place.  First of all, thank you for being so actively involved in the blog for your classes. I am…

Yesterday was the final day of the meeting with many late breaking poster presentations as well as this year’s Nobel Laureate lecture. This year’s American Physiological Society Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine Lecture was given by Dr. Robert J Lefkowitz from Howard Hughes Med. Inst. and  Duke Univ. Med. Ctr. He was awarded the Nobel…

Yesterday (Tuesday) was another great day for Comparative Physiology! Congratulations to Dr. Arthur DeVries (above; Professor Emeritus, Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology; Professor of Animal Biology, University of Illinois), this year’s recipient of the August Krogh Distinguished lecturer award from the Comparative and Evolutionary Physiology section of the American Physiological Society. Dr. DeVries gave…

What a great way to start the day

I came across this video on YouTube of what must be the most huggable kitty:

Monday was a great day for comparative physiology at EB! I saw several highly notable posters and seminars that I would like to share with you: Catherine Ivy, graduate student at McMaster University compared deer mice that were raised at high altitudes versus those raised at lower altitudes and found that the ancestry of the…

2015 Experimental Biology- Day 2

I was very impressed by the graduate and undergraduate students who presented their research at the Scholander poster competition sponsored by the Comparative and Evolutionary Physiology section of the American Physiological Society this afternoon. I am sure the winner of the competition will be very difficult to select. Some highlights included: Bridget Martinez, graduate student at the University of California…

2015 Experimental Biology Meeting

I am so excited about the Experimental Biology conference this year in Boston, MA! I have packed my bags, prepared my posters and am on my way to the airport. As usual there will be several seminars and poster sessions about various comparative physiology topics sponsored by the American Physiological Society that look really exciting. Can’t wait! To…

Blue bloods

A new study demonstrates that the blue oxygen carrying haemocyanin pigment in the blood of an Antarctic octopus (Pareledone charcoti) protect the animals from freezing temperatures. In fact, when compared to other octopus species from warmer climates, they have up to 40% more haemocyanin. Dr. Michael Oellermann, lead study author from Alfred-Wegener-Institute, provided the following quote…