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Make no bones about it

For all the fellow fish-lovers out there, you must check out this article on a new exhibit of fish bones! Kyle Luckenbill of the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia has been taking x-rays of fish specimens. The photos were so attractive, they are now displayed in an art exhibit.

The Physiology of Marine Mammals

I was on a one-day deep sea fishing trip off the coast of Southern California and the topic of diving mammals came up as we were watching sea lions swim around our boat. They must have been attracted to the same school of fish we were trying to catch. I must admit they were more…

Props to You, Dr. Narins

I love YouTube! If I could just sit and watch it for eight hours a day, seven days a week, I could probably win a Nobel Prize in Comparative Physiology. When you get a Nobel Prize, you get the prize itself, a diploma (as though I need another diploma), and of course the Swedish Kroners.…

Let’s Talk Fish

I love fishing! I just returned from a weekend fishing trip with my family where we caught these beautiful trout (see photo). Speaking of fish, I just finished listening to a LifeLines podcast from The American Physiological Society in which Barbara Block from Stanford University discussed her research on bluefin tuna. Dr. Block uses electronic…

Photo: Blue crab being monitored for metabolism using a respirometer, courtesy of Louis and Karen Burnett. Based on information presented at the Global Change and Global Science: Comparative Physiology in a Changing World conference, August 4-7, 2010 in Westminster, Colorado. Louis Burnett, professor of biology and director of the Grice Marine Laboratory of the College…

Based on information presented at the Global Change and Global Science: Comparative Physiology in a Changing World conference, August 4-7, 2010 in Westminster, Colorado. Photo:Budgerigars killed by a heat wave on a ranch in western Australia in 2009 courtesy of Blair Wolf. Blair Wolf, an associate professor of biology at the University of New Mexico,…

“XROMM”

The last night of the Comparative Physiology meeting I listened to the neatest lecture on visualizing change in animals given by Dr. Elizabeth Brainerd at Brown University. She provided a wonderful synopsis of imaging techniques throughout history and spoke about using satellites to image large animal migrations all the way down to various microscopy techniques.…

Paleophysiology…LOVE IT!

I just could not wait to write about a seminar that I listened to at the recent Comparative Physiology conference in Westminster, CO. The topic was “paleophysiology”. You got it, the study of physiology in extinct animals! Dr. Thomasz Owerkowicz, an Assistant Project Scientist with Dr. James Hicks at UC Irvine, spoke about his research…

Based on information presented at the Global Change and Global Science: Comparative Physiology in a Changing World conference, August 4-7, 2010 in Westminster, Colorado. Inna Sokolova, associate professor of biology at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, studies the affect of high carbon dioxide on oyster survival, growth and shell hardness. The results of…

Based on information presented at the Global Change and Global Science: Comparative Physiology in a Changing World conference, August 4-7, 2010 in Westminster, Colorado. Jessica Hellmann and her research team at Notre Dame have conducted a series of studies in which manipulating the temperature of the butterfly larvae’s environment revealed how the two species might…