Mike the Mad Biologist

Archives for March, 2011

Links 3/31/11

Links for you. Science: Livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus in Childcare Worker New paper: Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in a childcare worker “Castrated” Spiders Are Better Fighters, Study Says The spread of superbugs Other: Greg Mankiw: Budget Arsonist Screaming for a Firehose… Journamalism in 2011: Long on hyperbolic headlines and conflation, short on actual facts Thoughts on Libya…

I’ve written before about the effect poverty has on educational performance. From the City of Brotherly Love, Philadelphia, PA, we read this heartbreaking account of the violence many poor kids face in the classroom: A yearlong Inquirer investigation found that young children – from kindergartners to 10-year-olds – have been assaulting and threatening classmates and…

One of the issues I’ve discussed repeatedly is how resources–money–need to be shifted from data generation to data processing and analysis. This report about the Earth Microbiome Project, which will characterize 10,000 environmental (e.g., soil, water) samples is encouraging. Someone must have learned something from the last few years of microbiome work:

Links 3/30/11

Merry Wednesday! Links for you. Science: The Real Reason Women Quit Engineering Antarctic lake hints at a world of virus-attacking viruses The flat and the fit Other: A reason to cheat Beyond Erase to the Top: The Myth of Michelle Rhee Continues Illustrating How Infrastructure Deals Result in High Fees and Diminished Service Conservative Think…

In a very interesting post about political power and economic equality, William Hogeland recounts some uncivil exchanges between Thomas Paine and John Adams: Here’s John Adams on Thomas Paine’s famous 1776 pamphlet “Common Sense”: “What a poor, ignorant, malicious, short-sighted, crapulous mass.” Then comes Paine on Adams: “John was not born for immortality.”

Science Professor makes what I think is an entirely accurate assessment of the misery of many in the biomed academic world (emphasis original): However, much of what I have learned, although fascinating, has been second-order compared to this: People in the biomedical sciences seem to suffer a lot more than those of us in just…

Links 3/29/11

Links for you. Science: The High Water Mark of American Science Ancient America: The Mammoth Hunters A Brief Social-Belonging Intervention Improves Academic and Health Outcomes of Minority Students Other: Abusing Open Records to Attack Academic Freedom Public Pensions and Arithmetic Problems at Fox on 15th (a.k.a. The Washington Post) Krugman Is Wrong: The United States…

I’m a big fan of Brad DeLong’s blog even when I don’t agree with him. But one of the things that’s bothered me is when he reprints posts in full. For bloggers, professional or amateur, links are currency. Reprinting the post in full means people won’t be inclined to click through to your site. When…

Whenever a new discipline, especially one using a ‘sexy’ technology, is brought to bear on human disease, it seems to be oversold in what it will actually accomplish. In addition, every problem is suddenly viewed through that lens, that if we understand how phenomenon X influences something, then WE CAN HAZ CUREZ. I’m worried that…

Links 3/28/11

Links for you. Science: We need to work together to save the Statistical Abstract of the United States China pig crisis: Drug residues in pork Elizabeth Taylor: Beautiful Mutant Other: The trouble with fund management Nonprofits Must Stand Up and Fight for Themselves, or Perish It’s Tracking Your Every Move and You May Not Even…