Publishing

Mike the Mad Biologist

Category archives for Publishing

I came across this Science letter to the editor about a “gradual peer review process” by the associate editor for Plant Signalling and Behavior, Communicative and Integrative Biology; it’s pretty interesting:

The Misuse of Journal Impact Factors

I’ve written about journal impact factors before, largely to argue that there are better statistics than the traditional impact factor. But an excellent editorial in the Oct. 10 issue of Science by Kai Simons points out a very obvious problem with how impact factors are used (italics mine):

…and it’s symptomatic of a larger problem too. First, here’s what Eisen says about articles published in Science (and presumably Nature too; italics mine):

Reed Elsevier Is Stealing My Words

This displeases us greatly.

As usual, if you want to know the back story, Bora has the links. What has always steamed me about the for-profit publishers is that they charge so much for something they have very little part in manufacturing.

Review Articles or Review Chapters?

I’m approaching the tail end of grant writing season, and I’ve had to update my CV, put it in NIH format, and so on. It occurred to me while doing this is that there is very little professional incentive to write book chapters, since most (although not all) are not peer-reviewed, and consequently aren’t viewed…

ScienceBlogling Bora, in discussing the new release of journal impact factors–an estimation of how widely read journal articles are–writes:

A while ago, I posted about eigenFACTOR, a bioinformatics tool that can be used to calculate the relative impact of scientific journals. Well, the eigenFACTORials have developed a whole buncha new stuff you can do with the program:

So Font Does Matter…

…at least when it comes to road signs. The NY Times magazine has a fascinating article about how changing the font of road signs helps drivers see them, particularly late at night. The font that will be used is call “Clearview”:

What’s with Font Narratives?

In the back of a book I just finished, I noticed this odd paragraph on its own page: