The War on Science

Mike the Mad Biologist

Category archives for The War on Science

By way of Thers at Whiskey Fire, we read that the evangelical movement has recognized that sometimes homeschooling doesn’t quite get the job done: Suppose you have home-schooled your advanced blastocyst in the best evangelical wingnut way, to the age of 18. And suppose you recognize that no matter how much you would like to…

I’ve written many times that everything you need to know about movement conservatism can be understood by observing creationists (not surprising, since the theopolitical right is a major element of the conservative movement). I’m glad to see NY Times columnist and economist Paul Krugman has finally reached his ‘creationist moment’: the epiphany one realizes that,…

For those who don’t know, Texas is very important in determining what is found in U.S. textbooks due to its large purchasing power. While keeping anti-science wackaloons off of school boards is a good thing anywhere, it goes double in Texas. Sheril Kirshenbaum explains: There are two, local races, where every penny goes to work,…

Park 51: Lessons for the War on Science

Amanda Marcotte makes a very astute observation about the opposition to the non-mosque not-that-close-to-the-former-World-Trade-Center* that has arisen over the last month (italics mine): Make no mistake—all soft language about how it’s just too close to the WTC or how this is an assault on 9/11 victims is just crap to keep this whole controversy going,…

Can we once and for all recognize that movement conservatives do not believe in the fair exchange of ideas? A group of influential conservative members of the behemoth social media site Digg.com have just been caught red-handed in a widespread campaign of censorship, having multiple accounts, upvote padding, and deliberately trying to ban progressives. An…

Well, we can always hope. In a recent column about global warming, Paul Krugman makes this ancillary point (italics mine): Nor is this evidence tainted by scientific misbehavior. You’ve probably heard about the accusations leveled against climate researchers — allegations of fabricated data, the supposedly damning e-mail messages of “Climategate,” and so on. What you…

Like Digby, I had the same thought pop into my head when I read this LA Times story about the continued suppression of scientific findings in government agencies: this is the work of Bush-era ‘burrowers’–conservative apparatchiks who refuse to carry out the mission of the agency. What I don’t get is this bit (italics mine):…

Chris Mooney is encouraging people to read the longer paper on which his Washington Post op-ed piece was based (some of my thoughts on the op-ed are here). So I did. My short take: there’s some good, mixed in with some bad. I’ll behave unusually and describe the good first.

Once again, Chris Mooney has published an article castigating scientists for our supposedly poor communication skills. Since I‘ve dealt with this before, I don’t want to rehash old ground. But two good posts, one by ScienceBlogling Evil Monkey and Joe at Climate Progress, are worth noting because they echo some points I’ve made before (and…

Back when I owned a car*, car insurance payments were always depressing. In the best case scenario, I’m paying money for no purpose; in the worst case, I’ve been in a collision. Public health is a lot like car insurance, in that it’s really important when something bad happens, but when something bad doesn’t happen–either…