Mixing Memory

Archives for September, 2006

Publishing and Statistical Significance

There’s been some hubbub recently over a study by Gerber and Malhotra (you can get a copy in pdf here), which shows a couple things. First, political science journals don’t publish many articles that report negative (null) results, but instead tend to publish those that report statistically significant results. Second, a large portion of those…

I’ve never really hung out in a social psychology laboratory, but here is how I picture a typical day in one. There are some social psychologists sitting around, drinking some sort of exotic tea, and free associating. One psychologist will say the name of a random social psychological theory, and another will then throw out…

Back on the old blog, I wrote a series of posts in which I detailed a revolution in moral psychology. Sparked largely by recent empirical and theoretical work by neuroscientists, psychologists studying moral judgment have transitioned from Kantian rationalism, that goes back as far as, well, Kant (and in psychology, the Kantian Jean Piaget), to…

A Review of Buller on EP

A little over a year ago, I reviewed David Buller’s anti-Evolutionary Psychology book, Adapting Minds, arguing that, at least in the most important chapter, it fell far short of “demolishing” Evolutionary Psychology, as one philosopher claimed it had done. The problem, I noted, is that Buller didn’t refer to the bulk of the relevant research,…

Philosophy of Flirting

No, seriously. The paper in which Carrie Jenkins presents a conceptual analysis of flirting is here (via Online Papers in Philosophy). An except: What is it to flirt? Do you have to intend to flirt with someone in order to count as doing so? Can such things as dressing a certain way count as flirting?…

The Day the Mississippi Flowed Backwards

OK, this has nothing to do with cognitive science, but today’s quake felt throughout the southeast reminded me of a little history that some people may not be aware of. In Tennessee, there is only one large natural lake, Reelfoot Lake, in the far western part of the state just south of Kentucky, near the…

This Just In: Monkeys Not Mozart Fans

Over the years I’d heard that, lurking in the basements of psychology departments at various universities throughout the world, there are psychologists studying music cognition, but until the publication of a special issue of the journal Cognition, I hadn’t really paid any attention to them. That issue (especially Ray Jackendoff’s “The capacity for music: What…