Mixing Memory

Archives for October, 2006

Vote for Blogging Scholarship

OK, so apparently there’s a blogging scholarship, and it just so happens that someone who comments here at Mixing Memory, Jennifer Wong of Cyberspace Rendezvous, is a finalist, as is fellow Science Blogger Shelley Batts. You should go vote for one of those two here. I’m going to endorse Jennifer, not only because she comments…

Jeffrey-Lindley Paradox

Via Amy Perfors at the Harvard statistics blog, Social Science Statistics Blog, I learned of the Jeffrey-Lindley Paradox in statistics. The paradox is that if you have a sample large enough, you can get p-values that are very close to zero, even though the null hypothesis is true. You can read a very in depth…

As I said yesterday, I love research that challenges the common sense view that perception, especially visual perception, represents the world as it “is.” The paper I talked about there showed cognitive influences (memory) on relatively low-level visual processes (color perception occurs pretty early). Minutes (like 2!) after I finished writing that post, ScienceDirect sent…

Color Memory Changes Color Perception

One of the things that I love the most about cognitive science is that it’s always challenging our intuitions about the world and how we perceive it. Think, for example, of all the classic Gestalt illusions, such as my all time favorite, the Kanizsa Triangle. What these illusions, and many other findings over the history…

You may have seen this illusion in a post from earlier in the week over at Cognitive Daily, but I thought I’d say a little bit more about it, and talk about a related illusion. First, click play (from Sham’s demo site) If the illusion is working — Dave at Cognitive Daily had a bit…

There’s a really interesting post by Alberto over at Alpha Psy titled “Methodological Materialism” that I thought I’d point you to, in case you hadn’t read it already. Here’s an excerpt: As I see things, there is no deeper epistemological concern in recognizing that methods from natural sciences are increasingly being applied to social sciences…

By now you’ve probably heard about the Dar-Nimrod and Heine study on stereotype threat and math performance in women. If you’re interested in learning more about that study, check out Hugo’s post at Alpha Psy. Since Hugo did such a nice job describing the study, and since I’m lazy, I’m not going to say anything…

Just to let you know where things stand, I’m in the process of setting up the study. Some of the coding is a bit over my head, because I’ve never done this sort of thing on the web before. Fellow Science Blogger Razib has been helping me a great deal, but if you have knowledge…

Enhanced Vision in the Deaf

Everyone’s heard that losing a particular sensory modality causes the sensitivity of the other modalities to be heightened. Blind people are supposed to hear and smell really, really well, for example. While this is something that’s been talked about for ages, there are actual neuroscinetific reasons for thinking that it might be true. When an…

OK, the initial response to my quesitons about the internet study was overwhelmingly positive, so I’m going to go ahead with it. I just need one more thing from you. Ordinarily with a study like this, I would run a pilot study to figure out exactly what concepts to include in the final version, but…