Mixing Memory

Archives for November, 2006

Medieval Philosophy of Mind

In a comment at the end of the Religion and Science post, Brandon of Siris mentions Peter King as a source for discussions of Anselm’s ontological argument. If you’re interested, here’s a link to his encyclopedia entry on Anselm, and this paper discusses the logic of the argument in more detail. Readers of this blog…

The Importance of Names

Originally posted on the old blog on 3/8/2005, and reposted here out of laziness. The Importance of Names What’s in a name, for a concept I mean? Cognitive psychologists studying concepts and categorization have, notby and large, treated concept names (often called “category labels”) as just another kind of feature. I’m not sure there’s really…

According to many theories of embodied cognition (particularly type 5), perception is designed to facilitate bodily action, and therefore perception and movement are deeply connected. Much of the evidence for this position comes from research on the relationship between attitudes and movements. For example, Cacioppo, Priester, and Berntson1 showed that if people were presented with…

International Philosophy

One more short post before we return to your regularly scheduled long-winded cog sci stuff. Greece vs. Germany on the soccer field. Enjoy.

Using Blogs In Education

I stumbled upon a paper on using blogs in education, with a focus on small colleges, and I thought it might be of interest to some of you. Here’s the blog post with a link to the paper.

“Six Views of Embodied Cognition”

Those of you interested in embodied cognition, and issues of knowledge representation, should find this paper interesting: Wilson, M. (2002). Six views of embodied cognition. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, 9(4), 625-636. Abstract The emerging viewpoint of embodied cognition holds that cognitive processes are deeply rooted in the body’s interactions with the world. This position actually…

Atheism and Suspicion

I beseech you, my brothers, remain faithful to the earth, and do not believe those who speak to you of otherworldly hopes! Poison-mixers are they, whether they know it or not. Despisers of life are they, decaying and poisoned themselves, of whom the earth is weary: so let them go. Once the sin against God…

Religion and Science

You’ve probably all heard about the Beyond Belief series, in which scientists give talks about the conflict between science and religion, as well as the science of religion. I’ve only watched the cognitive scientists (and Dawkins, for reasons I’ll mention below), so far, and that’s probably all I’ll watch. If you’re looking for them, V.S.…

Originally posted on the old blog on 4/3/05. Self-Perpetuating Paradigms: How Scientists Deal With Unexpected Results Previously, I discussed Kevin Dunbar’s research on the use of

Fear Goggles

One of the more popular theories of emotion during the 60s and 70s was Schachter and Singer’s two-factor theory1. The theory is pretty simple. As the name suggests, it states that emotions have two components: arousal and a cognitive component that involves “labeling” the emotion based on context. Schacter and Singer’s famous study involved giving…