Mixing Memory

Archives for November, 2006

Gender Differences In Planning?

We all know that there are gender differences in neuroanatomy, as well as in some cognitive tasks (females tend to do better on memory and verbal tasks, men on spatial tasks) and both cognitive and emotional development, though it’s not clear how the cognitive/behavioral/developmental differences relate to the differences in neuroanatomy. Research on gender differences…

Suggestions

Hello everyone. Since the traffic’s been up lately, meaning there are probably a lot of new people around, I thought I’d ask for any suggestions or requests you might have. Also, if you’re wondering about the framing project, it’s still in the works. I’ve talked to some others about it, and received a lot of…

This Is What I Want For Christmas!

Coolest toy ever: Via the Social Science Statistics Blog.

Research on cultural differences between East Asians (Japanese, Korean, and Chinese in most studies) and Western Europeans/Americans (mostly Americans) have shown, among other things, that westerners tend to reason analytically, while East Asians tend to reason more holistically. This means, among other things, that westerners tend to pay more attention to focal objects at the…

Fear Helps You See Better

The study of the influence of emotion on cognition and perception has really taken off over the last decade or so, which is a good thing, because cognitive psychologists pretty much ignored emotion for a long time, so we have some catching up to do. Over at PsyBlog, Jeremy Dean summarizes an Annual Review paper…

Gregg Henriques On a Unified Psychology

A couple weeks ago, I wrote a post on the unification of psychology, in which I addressed (rather critically) a paper by Gregg Henriques. Dr. Henriques was kind of enough to reply in comments, and because it’s a two-week old post, I didn’t want his comment to languish in obscurity as a result of the…

One of my favorite perceptual illusions isn’t actually visual. It’s often called the “cutaneous rabbit” illusion1, for reasons that will be apparent in a moment. I stumbled across it when reading a paper by Dennett and Kinsbourne2. Here’s their description of the illusion (p. 188): The subject’s arm rests cushioned on a table, and mechanical…

Intelligent Design and Education Paper

Some of you might be interested in this short article from the February 2006 issue of Trends in Cognitive Sciences: Lombrozo, T., Shtulman, A., & Weisberg, M. (2006) The Intelligent Design controversy: lessons from psychology and education. Trends in Cognitive Science, 10(2), 56-57. Here’s the first paragraph, to whet your appetite: The current debate over…

There’s nothing like having a curious child to make you aware of just how little you actually know about the world. Often (more often than I’d like to admit), my son (Darth Vader over there on the left) will ask me a question about how something works, or why something happens the way it does,…

For several years, researchers have been contrasting human-human and human-computer interactions in order go gain more insight into theory of mind. The assumption is that people don’t treat computers like, well, people. It’s not a totally unfounded assumption, either. In several studies in which people have competed with computers in games like the prisoner’s dilemma…