Mixing Memory

Archives for November, 2006

Do Children Attribute False Beliefs to God?

Originally posted on the old blog on 1/4/2005. Reposted here out of laziness. Do Children Attribute False Beliefs to God? Humans are fallible. This is a fact that most adults understand. God, on the other hand, is not, by definition This is also a fact that most adults, in most cultures, recognize. An interesting empirical…

To the Floyd Fans

I’m a huge Pink Floyd fan. I still look upon the time I saw them live in 1994 as a religious experience. Unlike many Floyd fans my age, though, I prefer their early albums to their later ones (up to and including Obscured by Clouds, but especially A Saucer Full of Secrets, Ummagumma, Atom Heart…

Chernoff Faces

The stuff in this post at the Social Science Statistics Blog is seriously cool. Data representation in faces (in the post, the data represented is baseball stats — go Braves!). From the post: Chernoff faces are a method introduced by Herman Chernoff (Prof Emeritus of Applied Math at MIT and of Statistics at Harvard) in…

In keeping with the theme of illusions that result from crossmodal interactions, this week’s illusion is the ventriloquism effect, first reported by Howard and Tempelton in 1966. As you can probably tell from the name, the ventriloquism effect involves visual information influencing where we think sounds occur, like the moving mouth of a ventriloquist’s dummy…

Time-Space Metaphors: A Proposed Experiment

Earlier today I posted about the spatial and temporal ventriloquism aftereffects. One of the reasons I find those effects fascinating because I think they might hint at a counterargument to recent studies by Daniel Casasanto and Lera Boroditsky that seem to provide evidence that time is metaphorically structured through spatial experience and concepts, as I…

Nostalgia: What, When, and Why?

Anytime I hear songs from when I was in high school or college, I get very nostalgic. I remember people I knew, places I went, good times I had. It’s a powerful and complex feeling, with all sorts of interesting psychological aspects, but for some reason, I’d never really thought about studying it. Then I…

1994 vs. 2006

There’s an interesting statistical comparison between the 1994 Republican victory and the 2006 Democratic victory at the Columbia stats blog. From the post: The Democrats’ victory in the 2006 election has been compared to the Republicans’ in 2004. But the Democrats actually did a lot better in terms of the vote. The Democrats received 56%…

The last post on time-space metaphor research has sparked a really interesting discussion in the comments (go check it out), so I thought I’d talk about some more research to see if we can’t get even more people talking. If you’ve been following that discussion, this is the research by Daniel Casasanto and Lera Boroditsky…

Political Analogies

It’s time for another reposting of something I wrote on the old blog. Laziness reigns again. This is a post on research on political analogies, originally posted on March 29, 2005. If it looks like it’s starting in the middle, that’s because it is. I left out the beginning of the post because it had…

By now you’ve probably all heard about the paper published by Plotnik, de Waal, and Reiss in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in late October titled “Self-recognition in an Asian elephant.” I suspect that for people who study elephants, the results described in that paper come as no surprise. Researchers have been…