Mixing Memory

Archives for June, 2007

The Cognitive Psychology of Baseball!

Ah, yes, a real game (kidding, Scrabble people). If you’ve watched many baseball games or baseball movies, you know that one of the things that makes for a successful hitter is the ability to predict what the next pitch will be. Is it going to be inside or outside? Will it be a fastball or…

Dupes, All

I know I’ve said this before, but I’m going to say it again. Anyone who reads the fundamentalist atheist blogs (you know, like the biggest blog on ScienceBlogs) knows that these people have a lot of passion and energy. They use it to write 50 posts a week pummeling creationists and telling us how evil…

So here’s the first post on statistics. If you know the basics, and I suspect most of you do, then you can just ignore these posts (unless you want to check to make sure I’m getting it right). If you don’t know the basics, then hopefully you will when I’m done. Even for those of…

The Cognitive Psychology of Scrabble?

I kid you not: Halpern, D.F., & Wai, J. (2007). The world of competitive Scrabble: Novice and expert differences in visuospatial and verbal vbilities. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied, 13(2), 79-94. Competitive Scrabble players spend a mean of 4.5 hr a week memorizing words from the official Scrabble dictionary. When asked if they learn word…

The Basics of Statistics

So the other day, I was talking to someone about one of the studies I was planning on posting about. I mentioned one of the results, and he said he’d really like to see the means and standard deviations. I thought to myself, “Alright, I’ll put those in the post,” but when I actually started…

It’s now clear that by age 3, children have a pretty sophisticated theory of mind, which includes an understanding of the limits of the causal powers of thought. They know that thoughts cause behaviors and other thoughts, but they’re also aware that simply thinking about something can’t affect it. Except, according to a recent paper…

Picture in your head one person throwing a ball to another. How were the two people oriented spatially? Was one on the left, and the other on the right? If so, which one was on the left, and which on the right? Chances are, the thrower was on the left, and the catcher was on…

Turn it Up (O, Child)

Jonathan Rowe, over at Positive Liberty, posted a link to Ophelia from The Last Waltz. Because I’ve been a fan of The Band since I was a little kid, I’m upping the ante, with “Carivan” with Van, the Man, who just tosses the mic and walks off stage at the end:

Color Opponency in Synaesthesia

All of you are probably familiar with color opponency, but just in case, I’ll give you a quick refresher. I’ll even start with the history. In the 19th century, there were two competing theories of color vision. The first was the Young-Helmholtz theory (sometimes called the trichromatic theory), which argued that there were three types…

Explaining the War of the Metaphors1

In his comment to my post on conceptual metaphor theory (CMT), reposted here, Dr. Gibbs writes: The topic of why conceptual metaphor theory arouses such vehemence is one that greatly interests me and is again the subject of my in progress book. My own opinion is that conceptual metaphor theory, and other related ideas from…