Mixing Memory

Archives for March, 2008

Moral Psychology on Blogging Heads

You can see Josh Knobe, of Experimental Philosophy fame, and Paul Bloom, who doesn’t have a blog but has one of them professorship things up at some podunk little school in New Haven, CT, talking about research in moral psychology here.

ΔV, Dude

Just to show that there are no hard feelings between behaviorists and cognitive psychologists, we’ve created an R-W t-shirt: Here’s the back: I don’t know about you, but I think this t-shirt would be great for dates, parties, rock concerts, and weddings.

It would be a horrible cliché to begin a post about the reconstructive nature of autobiographical memory with a Proust quote, so instead I’ll begin with something only slightly less cliché: beginning something about memory by talking about my own experience. You see, I’m southern, as anyone who’s ever heard me pronounce the words “pen”…

Encounters With Behaviorists

Recently, I saw a famous learning theorist — perhaps one of the two most influential learning theorists in the last 40 or so years; if ΔV = αβ(λ – ΣV) means anything to you, you’ll have narrowed it down to the two — give a talk at the behavioral neuroscience area’s weekly colloqium here. The…

You know, just the other day, on this very blog, I swore I would never read another (cognitive) imaging paper again, but between then and now, I’ve read 5 of 6, so apparently my oath didn’t take. It’s sort of like my constantly telling myself, as I ride the bus to campus in the morning,…

Stereotype Threat Happens in the Brain

That’s it! I’m never reading another imaging paper again, ever. OK, I might read one or two, and I might even post about them, but for now I’m telling myself, for my own sanity, that I’m never, ever, under any circumstances, going to read another imaging study. If you read my last post, or have…

Static Motion After Effects?

I really do love illusions of all sorts, in large part because they fit nicely into my narrative about the fallibility of human thought, but illusions are also great as windows into the ordinary working of our brains. For example, color afterimages provide direct evidence for opponent-processing theories of color vision, and when we find…

A Quick Explanation

Because some people seem to be misinterpreting what I was saying in the last post, and even arguing against it by suggesting that I should have taken the position that I did, in fact, take, let me summarize my points in a few sentences. The main point is that because I don’t feel like I…

Discussion of a paper titled “Respect and Religion,” by Simon Blackburn, is making its way through the blogosphere, and sparking some interesting discussion (particularly over at Crooked Timber, but this is a good read too). The key quote from Blackburn’s article is this: We can respect, in the minimal sense of tolerating, those who hold…

It Got Me

At least I got the number of passes right. See it here, via Mind Hacks.