Cognitive Neuroscience

Mixing Memory

Category archives for Cognitive Neuroscience

[First published on 2/4/05 at the old blog.] If you’ve read my two previous posts on Ramachandran’s principles of art (here and here), you’ve probably got a good idea of what Ramachandran’s concept of beauty is. While his 10 principles of art are concerned more with the production of art and the visual principles that…

[First published on 1/22/05 at the old blog.] Recall V.S. Ramachandran’s 10 principles of art. Peak shift Perceptual Grouping and Binding Contrast Isolation Perceptual problem solving Symmetry Abhorrence of coincidence/generic viewpoint Repetition, rhythm and orderliness Balance Metaphor In the last post, I talked about the first three. In this post, I’ll discuss 4, 5, 6,…

[First published on 1/20/05 at the old blog.] As a starting point for the attempt to discover universals in art based on our knowledge of neuroscience, and visual neuroscience in particular, V.S. Ramachandran has proposed ten principles of art (eight of which come from the paper he wrote with William Hirstein, titled “The Science of…

[First posted on 1/20/05 at the old blog] With all the controversy surrounding the issues in my last few posts, I thought it would be refreshing to talk about something completely uncontroversial: the existence of universals in art based on neurological mechanisms. (That was a joke, people). I’ve been doing some research on the cognitive…

The Neuroscience of Playing Chicken

Theory of mind, or how we think about what’s going on in other people’s heads, continues to be one of the hottest topics in cognitive science today. A debate continues to rage over whether we reason about other people’s thoughts by means of theory-like propositional knowledge, or through simulation (i.e., putting yourself in their shoes……

Back in May, a study by Mitchell, Macrae, and Banaji (of Implicit Association Test fame) was published in Neuron that made the following claim (from the abstract): We observed a double dissociation such that mentalizing about a similar other engaged a region of ventral mPFC linked to self-referential thought, whereas mentalizing about a dissimilar other…

A Lot of People in White Coats

Dave over at Cognitive Daily beat me to this (curse you, Dave!), but I wanted to point everyone to an article in Seed Magazine by Paul Bloom, titled “Seduced by the Flickering Lights of the Brain.” If you can’t tell from the title, the article is on the lure of imaging studies, and the sense…

In the past, I’ve often wondered how journalists pick which studies to write about. The obvious answer is that they pick studies that will get readers or viewers, but given how little their stories correspond with the research they’re writing about, it seems to me like they could pick any study and make it sellable.…

Neural Adaptation for Gender

In yesterday’s post on afterimages and aftereffects, I mentioned that demonstrations of neural adaptation for a particular feature (in the post, I used the examples of color and motion) is generally taken as evidence of the existence of specific neurons or groups of neurons that detect/process that feature. With motion or color, which are very…

Anyone who’s ever taken a bite of a Reese’s Peanut butter Eggs that are only sold during the Easter season knows that chocolate is a mood enhancer, but in case you thought it might just be the wonderful taste, there is actual empirical evidence that chocolate can elevate your mood. Specifically, eating chocolate appears to…