Cognitive Psychology

Mixing Memory

Category archives for Cognitive Psychology

I’ve been meaning to post about this set of studies for a while, but because it’s relevant to Chapter 4 of Lakoff’s The Political Mind, I figured I’d better get around to it before I write the review of that chapter. It’s been a while, but in the past, I’ve talked a lot about new…

There’s an interesting short paper by Paul Bloom and Susan Gelman in the July issue of Trends in Cognitive Science with that title. Unfortunately, it’s not yet available without a subscription (though Bloom tends to put his papers on his website once published, so it might show up there sometime in the near future), but…

Darwin’s Mistake

Got your attention, right? That’s the title of a paper by Penn, Holyoak, and Povinelli in April’s Behavioral and Brain Sciences. Well, the full title is “Darwin’s mistake: Explaining the discontinuity between human and nonhuman minds.” Here’s the abstract: Over the last quarter century, the dominant tendency in comparative cognitive psychology has been to emphasize…

Getting Crows to Clean Up After Us

Interesting (and short) video of a talk by Joshua Klein (via HENRY) on how smart crows are, and how we might use their intelligence:

This Is Your Brain On Free Choice

Last month, a paper was published in Nature, in which Kay et al(1) were able to guess which of their stimuli a person was seeing by looking at their fMRI scans. The model looked something like this (from Kay et al’s Figure 1, p. 352): The image the participant is seeing is on the left,…

You know, just the other day, on this very blog, I swore I would never read another (cognitive) imaging paper again, but between then and now, I’ve read 5 of 6, so apparently my oath didn’t take. It’s sort of like my constantly telling myself, as I ride the bus to campus in the morning,…

Static Motion After Effects?

I really do love illusions of all sorts, in large part because they fit nicely into my narrative about the fallibility of human thought, but illusions are also great as windows into the ordinary working of our brains. For example, color afterimages provide direct evidence for opponent-processing theories of color vision, and when we find…

False Autobiographical Memories

One of the criticisms of most false memory research is that it lacks ecological validity. For example, in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott (DRM) paradigm, a common method for inducing false memories in the lab, involves giving participants a bunch of words (e.g., bed, rest, nap, snore, etc.) that are all associated with another word that’s not presented…

Embodied Cognition in the Boston Globe

In case you haven’t seen it already, there’s an article on the embodied cognition “revolution” in the Boston Globe. This, I think, is the best point to take away from it: “I think these findings are really fantastic and it’s clear that there’s a lot of connection between mind and body,” says Arthur Markman, a…

There’s a paper in the December 2007 issue of Psychological Science titled “Google and the Mind: Predicting Fluency With PageRank.” Here’s the abstract: Griffiths, T.L., Steyvers, M., & Firl, A. (2007). Google and the mind: Predicting fluency with PageRank. Psychological Science, 18(12), 1069-1076. Abstract Human memory and Internet search engines face a shared computational problem,…