Cognitive Psychology

Mixing Memory

Category archives for Cognitive Psychology

Color Opponency in Synaesthesia

All of you are probably familiar with color opponency, but just in case, I’ll give you a quick refresher. I’ll even start with the history. In the 19th century, there were two competing theories of color vision. The first was the Young-Helmholtz theory (sometimes called the trichromatic theory), which argued that there were three types…

Tomasello on Infant Pointing

Those of you who are interested in Michael Tomasello’s work as a follow up to his book The Cultural Origins of Human Cognition may be interested in his new paper with Malinda Carpenter and Ulf Liszkowski, “A New Look at Infant Pointing“. The abstract: We propose a new theory of infant pointing involving multiple layers…

The Brain Makes It Better

About a year ago, there was an article in Seed Magazine titled “Seduced by the Flickering Lights of the Brain,” in which Paul Bloom argued that people are too easily seduced by neuroscience, believing that it made for good science, even when it doesn’t. At the end of the article, Bloom mentioned a then unpublished…

A little over a year ago, I wrote a post describing some research showing that there are cognitive barriers to understanding evolution. There I listed three specific factors: Intuitive theism, in which our intuitions lead us to make design inferences about complex kinds or under conditions of uncertainty; intuitions that can be reinforced culturally to…

Mind Metaphors

Some of you who are interested in the history of psychology or philosophy of mind might find this paper interesting: Gentner, D., & Grudin, J. (1985). The evolution of mental metaphors in psychology: A 90-year retrospective. American Psychologist, 40(2), 181-192. Abstract It seems plausible that the conception of the mind has evolved over the first…

File this one in the annals of “huh?” There’s been a lot of research over the last decade or so on what only be described as the bizarre implicit priming of social concepts. In a typical experiment, participants are given lists or scrambled sentences that contain words associated with a particular stereotype or attitude and…

The Amazing Color Changing Card Trick

Cool video (via Bill Benzon over at The Valve: A bit more below the fold, but only after you watch the video.

The Science of Goalkeeping

OK, this research is pretty silly, and quite frankly, I can’t imagine what compelled the researchers to undertake it, but because it has to do with something I love, soccer, I feel compelled to blog about it. There this short report in the March issue of Psychological Science that I just got around to reading…

I have to admit that I’ve been avoiding the “framing science” discussion that’s been going on in the science blogosphere recently, mostly because I’d rather talk about what framing is and how it works than two author’s rather vague ideas about how to use framing in a particular area of discourse. And because the Science…

In the recent dust up over “framing science,” there’s been more hand waving than any actual discussion of, you know, framing. However, I was struck by one point that fellow ScienceBlogger Matt Nisbet, one of the authors of the Science article that sparked this whole mess, made in comments to my post on the discussion.…