Research & Theory

Mixing Memory

Category archives for Research & Theory

This morning, while I was riding the bus to campus, I checked my email on my phone (man, I love that thing), and had a cognitive psychology topic alert from ScienceDirect. There were only three papers in the alert, but the title of the first one caught my eye: “No disease in the brain of…

The January issue of the journal Perspectives on Psychological Science (the same journal that gave us the alien IAT) has some really interesting, and short, review articles. Unfortunately, they’re only available with a subscription, but for those of you who are lucky enough to have access to a university library, I thought I’d point you…

Emotion Study

Jeremy Dean of PsyBlog is doing another online study, this time on emotions, and he needs participants. So if you have about 10 minutes, and you’d like to participate in some real live research, click here and follow his instructions.

Chernoff Faces

The stuff in this post at the Social Science Statistics Blog is seriously cool. Data representation in faces (in the post, the data represented is baseball stats — go Braves!). From the post: Chernoff faces are a method introduced by Herman Chernoff (Prof Emeritus of Applied Math at MIT and of Statistics at Harvard) in…

If you’re not reading the Columbia University stats blog, Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science, you’re missing a lot of great stuff. For example, today’s post by Andrew Gelman discusses the paper “Forecasting House Seats from Generic Congressional Polls” by Bafumi, Erikson, and Wlezian. From the paper: This paper is intended to provide some…

Autism and Television

Every once in a while I run across a paper that I have no idea what to make of. That happened earlier today, when I read a paper titled “Does television cause autism?” by Waldman, Nicholson, and Adilov (you can read the entire paper at that link). Television causes autism? If you’d asked me this…

Publishing and Statistical Significance

There’s been some hubbub recently over a study by Gerber and Malhotra (you can get a copy in pdf here), which shows a couple things. First, political science journals don’t publish many articles that report negative (null) results, but instead tend to publish those that report statistically significant results. Second, a large portion of those…

Ant-Like Navigation in Robots

The literature on robot navigation is huge, and summarizing it would be difficult, if not impossible, but I thought I’d provide a few examples of papers you can read on robots that utilize ant-like navigational mechanisms. Franz, M.O., Schölkof, B., Mallot, H.A., & Bülthoff, H.H. (1998). Learning view graphs for robot navigation. Autonomous Robots, 5,…

Traveling Ants

I’m going to play biologist for a moment, and talk about a species other than humans or nonhuman primates. First, imagine that you’re about 10 mm long, a couple mm high, and you’re stuck in the middle of the Sahara desert. Eventually you’ve got to find food, so you leave the comfort of your burrow…

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post that was pretty critical of the current state of Experimental Philosophy. In the post, I focused on the work of Joshua Knobe, not because his work is the worst Experimental Philosophy has to offer, but because it is, in my mind, the best by far. Yesterday on…