Social Cognition

Mixing Memory

Category archives for Social Cognition

I’ve been meaning to post about this set of studies for a while, but because it’s relevant to Chapter 4 of Lakoff’s The Political Mind, I figured I’d better get around to it before I write the review of that chapter. It’s been a while, but in the past, I’ve talked a lot about new…

“They only care about themselves,” “They’re out of touch with reality,” “They don’t become academics.” These are just some of the answers people yelled at me yesterday when I read out loud the title of a paper in the June issue of Psychological Science. My answer was “some of each.” Oh, the paper, by Napier…

Who says religion and science can’t go together well? I just read an interesting paper by Kinzler et al.(1), published last year in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences with apparent Biblical inspiration (OK, maybe not), as it begins with Judges 12:5-6 as an epigraph. In that passage, group membership is determined by…

Stereotype Threat Happens in the Brain

That’s it! I’m never reading another imaging paper again, ever. OK, I might read one or two, and I might even post about them, but for now I’m telling myself, for my own sanity, that I’m never, ever, under any circumstances, going to read another imaging study. If you read my last post, or have…

God (and Gadgets) of the Lonely?

I’ve been hanging out with fellow atheists for a while now, and one of the more common discussions I’ve had when the topic of religion comes up is, why are people religious? The two most common answers I’ve heard from atheist friends and acquaintances are that religion is a fantasy designed to explain the mysterious…

Combating Stereotype Threat in the Wild

As I believe I’ve said before, if anything good has come from the Larry Summers debacle of a few years ago, it’s that it inspired some really interesting research on gender differences in math. If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you’ve probably guessed that one of my favorite topics in that research…

I’ve blogged about some great papers in the past, but today I’m blogging about the best… paper… ever. It’s by Arina K. Bones, of the University of Darache in Monte Carlo, and Navin R. Johnson of Opti Corp, was published in the December issue of Perspectives on Psychological Science (with a subscription, you can read…

Priming “God Did It”

Recently, several social psychologists have posited a “Whodunit” system in the brain that’s always looking to assign authorship — either our own or somebody else’s — to actions. Most of the time, it’s pretty easy to tell when we’ve done something, because we have all sorts of signals coming from the body, along with the…

The uproar surrounding Larry Summers’ remarks on women in science and engineering, made almost three years ago (man, I’m getting old!) has died down, but the literature on social/environmental factors responsible, at least in part, for the large gender disparities in math-heavy fields continues to grow at a steady pace, continually putting to lie many…

Make ‘Em Bloody!

Offered without comment (and sorry, only available with subscription; maybe I’ll say something more about it later), except to say, why the hell am I not doing stuff with video games? Bartlett, C.P., Harrisa, R.J., & Brueya, C. (In Press). The effect of the amount of blood in a violent video game on aggression, hostility,…