Social Cognition

Mixing Memory

Category archives for Social Cognition

How’s Your Life? I Dunno, Is It Raining?

If you’ve been reading this blog for a while, you probably know that I’m fascinated by findings that show just how little we know about ourselves. Most of what’s going on in our heads occurs below the level of awareness, and behind the often impenetrable barrier of the unconscious. Often when we’re asked to make…

Reading an article in the LA Times today, I learned something exciting: political differences in thought happen in the brain. At least that’s what a new study published in Nature Neuroscience(1) purports to show, though I hear that the next issue of the journal will contain critical responses from Descartes, Malenbranche, and Eccles. Seriously though,…

Called Strikes and Race: Et tu, Baseball?

A few months ago, I posted about a study showing implicit racial bias in NBA referees’ calls. Now it’s baseball’s turn, because yesterday reports of study by Parsons et al.1 that shows analogous results for home plate umpires began popping up all over the media. The study is pretty straightforward, though the data analysis must…

Originally posted on the old blog on 4/5/06, and reposted here and now out of laziness. It’s easy to see why research on motivated political reasoning/cognition has gotten a lot of attention in the blogosophere lately. It fits nicely with our intuitions about how people interpret political information (and by people, we mean other people,…

Are Conservatives Less Creative?

The belief that creativity and political conservatism are negatively correlated is widespread not only among the general public (except, maybe, among some conservatives), but among researchers in a variety of fields. And there are some indirect empirical justifications for this belief. Political conservatism is associated with less openness to experience (as measured with Big Five…

Have you ever read about a study, perhaps on this blog even, and thought to yourself, “Well those results are interesting in the lab, but they have absolutely no implications for life outside of the lab?” I remember quite clearly thinking exactly that when I was told about the name-letter effect several years ago. The…

Music and Peronality: A Study

It turns out that Jeremy of PsyBlog is currently running a study on music and personality in the UK. So if you’re reading this, and you live on one of those islands, you should go here and participate.

What Does Your Music Say About You?

I went to a high school at a time (one not that different from most others, I imagine) when musical preferences were a good clue to social group membership. There were, for example, the punks who listened to, well, punk; the stoners who listened to Pink Floyd’s “The Wall” over and over and over again;…

Religion and Tolerance

In the discussion that resulted from the last couple posts on religion, a lot of claims have been made, all of which are empirical claims, and all of which thereby require data. But of course, there’s not a whole lot of data out there, and what is out there is easy to interpret in a…

If you were hanging around ScienceBlogs yesterday, you probably came across this post at Pharyngula. In it, Dr. Myers links to an article on a study by Bushman et al.1 purporting to show that people are more aggressive after reading passages from the Bible in which God sanctions violence than after reading passages that don’t…