Myrmecos

Archives for May, 2010

Monday Night Mystery

What is this odd little beast? Five points each for the first person to pick the order and the family. The cumulative points winner for the month of May will win either 1) any 8×10 print from my insect photo galleries, or 2) a guest blog post on the (safe-for-work) topic of their choosing.

A trap-jaw ant…

…because badass mandibles are in style this season: Odontomachus turneri, Australia photo details: Canon EOS 50D camera Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens ISO 100, f/13, 1/250sec

The very funny Rowan Atkinson:

Happy Mother’s Day!

Pea Aphids, Acyrthosiphon pisum

The iPhone Macro Meme Spreads

Dandelion through the eyes of a macro-adapted iPhone 3G Nothing warms the heart of a blogger more than birthing a meme. A couple weeks ago I posted a short article on how a hand lens can enable a cell phone to do macrophotography. Other bloggers have taken to the idea and have been posting their…

A: If, at birthday parties, the featured game is “pin-the-stinger-on-the-bee.” your intrepid blogger, circa 1985 You may thank my mother for sending along this, um, interesting photo.

Anthrenus sp. carpet beetle Urbana, Illinois Little Anthrenus beetles are one of the most common insects across the northern hemisphere. Adults can be found in flowers feasting on pollen, and the detritivorous larvae are often inhabitants of homes and buildings. If you’d like to see one of these yourself, check your window sills- there’s a…

Strobe Ants

New this week at alexanderwild.com we have photographs of the Savanna Strobe Ant Opisthopsis haddoni. These delightfully perky insects inhabit open environments in northern Australia and are one of my favorite ants. Opisthopsis has excellent vision. The location of the compound eyes atop the head allows it to spot a photographer approaching from any direction…

From the “I-never-thought-I’d-use-this-class” file, I took a semester course once from an oil spill expert. Professor Ed Gilfillan had studied the response of Prince William Sound to various clean-up regimens following the wreck of the Exxon Valdez, and we spent weeks learning about chemistry of oil spills and the factors involved in ecological recovery. The…

They looked like little flowers, or miniature suction cups, but yesterday’s mystery was neither. Here’s a more recent view: Arilus cristatus, a newly hatched wheel bug nymph with eggs Ted MacRae of Beetles in the Bush picks up 6 points for guessing that they were Reduviid eggs, and MarekB gets 4 for nabbing the genus…