Myrmecos

Archives for June, 2010

Soccer in Paraguay

Apropos of Paraguay’s victory in this morning’s world cup match against Slovakia, here’s a photo I took almost 15 years ago: This is a local match in the Paraguayan community where I lived as a Peace Corps volunteer. Our team, from Colonia 11 de Setiembre, beat Ype Jhu 2-1. But that’s not why I’m sharing…

A Dagger Fly, Victorious

A dagger fly (Diptera: Empididae), eating a fly it caught.Shawnee National Forest, Illinois Among the insects, one lineage in particular excels in the air: Diptera, the flies. These animals have evolved a gyroscopic control system that’s faster and more efficient than the standard insect sensory system, and as a consequence the flies are the most…

Asaphidion yukonense

Answer to the Monday Night Mystery

[The following is a guest post by Rob Mitchell] Rob here, back again with your answer to this week’s mystery… not that you need it! And here I thought I was being tricky. Six points to FormicidaeFantasy for hitting the order, family, and genus, and another four to Gordon Snelling for making quick work of…

I haven’t posted any ants for awhile. So here is a pair of little carpenter ants from the back yard: Camponotus nearcticus Camponotus caryae Most people in North America think of carpenter ants as the big hairy black things that damage houses by chewing through older and dry-rotted wood. That’s certainly true of Camponotus pennsylvanicus,…

Monday Night Mystery

[the following is a guest post from Rob Mitchell] Hi folks – Rob Mitchell here, guest blogger extraordinaire and your temporary replacement for Alex while he celebrates a recent age-related milestone. My job tonight is to provide you entomology sleuths with a mystery, so take a look here at exhibit A: Who is this gangly…

Glischrochilus sanguinolentus Bell Smith Springs, Illinois Just for you guys, here are some portraits of a colorful sap beetle in the family Nitidulidae I encountered in southern Illinois last weekend. It’s a charming little insect, especially the cute, clubby antennae. The challenge with shooting shiny insects such as Glischrochilus is lighting the insect without glare.…

You may have noticed I’ve been blogging rather lightly in recent weeks. That’s because I start teaching an introductory course on beekeeping next Monday. It’ll be a great class, I hope. But the preparation has cut into blogging time something fierce and will continue to do so through August. In any case, while making lecture…

Answer to the Monday Night Mystery

What was the strange insect that seemed a mutant cross between a bee and a beetle? Rhipiphorus wedge-shaped beetle, ovipositing into an aster Shawnee National Forest, Illinois Kudos and all 10 points go to coleopterist extraordinaire Ted MacRae of Beetles in the Bush, who provided the correct answer Coleoptera: Rhipiphoridae: Rhipiphorus . Rhipiphorus is unusual…