Ants

Myrmecos

Category archives for Ants

Tapinoma sessile Ant ecologist extraordinaire Rob Dunn sends along the following request: We are looking for live colonies of Aphaenogaster rudis Temnothorax curvispinosus or T. longispinosus Crematogaster lineolata Tapinoma sessile from anywhere within their ranges. If you are potentially willing to contribute colonies we would be very grateful. Please contact Sarah Diamond (sediamon@unity.ncsu.edu) regarding details.…

Messor decipiens, South Africa Here’s a photo I took last week. It shows a granivorous ant with an enormous head housing muscles for milling the harvest. I used Canon’s MP-E 65mm 1-5x lens and a twin flash diffused through two sheets of mylar. The last time I photographed this species was in the field in…

My review of Mark Moffett’s new ant book appears this morning in Myrmecological News: Let me start with the obvious: Adventures among ants is the most visually stunning ant book ever published. The physical product, from glossy paper to the tasteful font, is an aesthetic tour de force. The photographs are … well, this is…

An insider’s view of an ant colony

A worker cradles a freshly-laid egg in the brood nest of a laboratory colony of the Argentine Ant Linepithema humile. photo details: Canon EOS 7D camera Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens ISO 100, f/13, 1/250sec

Soccer in Paraguay

Apropos of Paraguay’s victory in this morning’s world cup match against Slovakia, here’s a photo I took almost 15 years ago: This is a local match in the Paraguayan community where I lived as a Peace Corps volunteer. Our team, from Colonia 11 de Setiembre, beat Ype Jhu 2-1. But that’s not why I’m sharing…

I haven’t posted any ants for awhile. So here is a pair of little carpenter ants from the back yard: Camponotus nearcticus Camponotus caryae Most people in North America think of carpenter ants as the big hairy black things that damage houses by chewing through older and dry-rotted wood. That’s certainly true of Camponotus pennsylvanicus,…

Another Cover

Due out November 2010. Original photo here.

Anochetus paripungens

Anochetus paripungens trap-jaw ant carrying a cocoon, Australia photo details: Canon EOS 50D camera Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens ISO 100, f/13, 1/250sec twin flash heads placed in front and behind the subject.

A clip from the documentary “Ants: Nature’s Secret Power“:

New Species: Asphinctopone pilosa

Asphinctopone pilosa Hawkes 2010 The discovery of new insect species continues apace. Today, the online journal Zootaxa presents this pretty little ponerine from Tanzania, described by Peter Hawkes. Asphinctopone is a rather poorly-known genus previously collected only in the tropical forests of West Africa. Asphinctopone pilosa is larger than the other described species and the…