Beetles

Myrmecos

Category archives for Beetles

An Inordinate Fondness for Beetles #1

The inaugural blog carnival celebrating the Beetles is now online- go see!

Answer to the Monday Night Mystery

I am impressed. Several of you* figured out the mystery behavior: reflex bleeding, a defensive response employed by some arthropods with especially nasty hemolymph to deter predators. A couple of you even pegged the identity of the mystery arthropod, a blister beetle in the genus Epicauta. Here’s the uncropped photo: Five points each to Tim,…

We here at Myrmecos Blog don’t care to voice our opinion of talk show host Glenn Beck. But we are rather enamored of dung beetles, those gorgeously ornamented insects who prevent the world from being buried in feces. Thus, we were pleased to find the following Facebook project in our inbox this weekend: Can This…

Meet Dynastes granti. This behemouth of an insect is North America’s heaviest scarab beetle, found in the mountains of the American southwest where adults feed on the sap of ash trees. I photographed these spectacular insects a few years ago while living in Tucson. The impressive pronotal horn on the beetle pictured above indicates a…

Friday Beetle Blogging: Trox Hide Beetle

Scarab’s shrewd cousin, Elytra warty like hide. Must be Trogidae! Photo details: Canon 100mm f2.8 macro lens on a Canon EOS 20D ISO 100, f/16, 1/250 sec, indirect strobe in white box

Notoxus desertus – Antlike Flower Beetle Pyramid Lake, Nevada This furry little beetle comes with its own sun visor, a horn-like structure that projects over the head from the pronotum.  I photographed this Notoxus along the shores of Pyramid Lake where it was feeding on pollen. Photo details: Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens on…

Chauliognathus pennsylvanicus Goldenrod Soldier Beetles Illinois, USA Here at Myrmecos Blog we aim for a family-friendly atmosphere.  Except for beetle sex.  Sometimes we just can’t resist. (There’s also plant sex going on here too, if you’re into that sort of thing…) Photo details: Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens on a Canon EOS 50D ISO…

Edrotes ventricosus (Tenebrionidae) – Dune Beetle California, USA In arid environments around the world, darkling beetles in the family Tenebrionidae are among the most prominent insects.  Their thick, waxy cuticles excel at retaining moisture.  Edrotes ventricosus is a dune inhabitant in southern California. Photo details: Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens on a Canon EOS…

Here’s a beetle that the genetics-inclined entomologist will recognize.  Tribolium castaneum, the red flour beetle, was the first Coleopteran to have its genome sequenced. This small tenebrionid is native to the Indo-Australian region but has become a pest of stored grains around the world.  I photographed these individuals from a lab culture at the University…

Sandalus niger is one of the oddest beetles in eastern North America.  While most parasitic insects are concentrated in other orders- notably Hymenoptera and Diptera- Coleoptera contains relatively few parasites.  But there are a few. Beetle larvae in the small polyphagan family Rhipiceridae attack cicada nymphs in their underground burrows.  Our local species is Sandalus…