Ants

Myrmecos

Tag archives for Ants

Tapinoma sessile Ant ecologist extraordinaire Rob Dunn sends along the following request: We are looking for live colonies of Aphaenogaster rudis Temnothorax curvispinosus or T. longispinosus Crematogaster lineolata Tapinoma sessile from anywhere within their ranges. If you are potentially willing to contribute colonies we would be very grateful. Please contact Sarah Diamond (sediamon@unity.ncsu.edu) regarding details.…

My review of Mark Moffett’s new ant book appears this morning in Myrmecological News: Let me start with the obvious: Adventures among ants is the most visually stunning ant book ever published. The physical product, from glossy paper to the tasteful font, is an aesthetic tour de force. The photographs are … well, this is…

An insider’s view of an ant colony

A worker cradles a freshly-laid egg in the brood nest of a laboratory colony of the Argentine Ant Linepithema humile. photo details: Canon EOS 7D camera Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens ISO 100, f/13, 1/250sec

I haven’t posted any ants for awhile. So here is a pair of little carpenter ants from the back yard: Camponotus nearcticus Camponotus caryae Most people in North America think of carpenter ants as the big hairy black things that damage houses by chewing through older and dry-rotted wood. That’s certainly true of Camponotus pennsylvanicus,…

A clip from the documentary “Ants: Nature’s Secret Power“:

Answer to the Monday Night Mystery

Who was that dashing ant of mystery and intrigue? Tetramorium simillimum is a small myrmicine that has tramped around the globe with human commerce, quietly inserting itself into native ecosystems. Like most insect species, little is known about its behavior or its interactions with other species. JasonC gets a clean sweep: ten points for correctly…

What does an ant genome look like?

Bits and pieces of an ongoing project to sequence the genome of the leafcutter ant Atta cephalotes have started going up on Genbank- Have a look! Of course, these are just raw strings of nucleotides that haven’t yet been annotated or analyzed in any meaningful way. The real science won’t begin until researchers begin testing…

A trap-jaw ant…

…because badass mandibles are in style this season: Odontomachus turneri, Australia photo details: Canon EOS 50D camera Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens ISO 100, f/13, 1/250sec

Strobe Ants

New this week at alexanderwild.com we have photographs of the Savanna Strobe Ant Opisthopsis haddoni. These delightfully perky insects inhabit open environments in northern Australia and are one of my favorite ants. Opisthopsis has excellent vision. The location of the compound eyes atop the head allows it to spot a photographer approaching from any direction…

Cocoon

An amazing photo posted this week at Antweb shows a developing male Cerapachys ant inside the silken cocoon: (Image by Erin Prado)