beetles

Myrmecos

Tag archives for beetles

Glischrochilus sanguinolentus Bell Smith Springs, Illinois Just for you guys, here are some portraits of a colorful sap beetle in the family Nitidulidae I encountered in southern Illinois last weekend. It’s a charming little insect, especially the cute, clubby antennae. The challenge with shooting shiny insects such as Glischrochilus is lighting the insect without glare.…

From the clever UK children’s series Smalltalk Diaries:

Oberea flavipes, phlox stem borer beetlesIllinois Here’s a boring beetle. That is, the larvae bore. They make their living carving tunnels through stems and consuming plant tissue. This pair was hanging out in the phlox in our back yard, apparently plotting the demise of our summer flower garden. photo details: Canon EOS 7D camera Canon…

Anthrenus sp. carpet beetle Urbana, Illinois Little Anthrenus beetles are one of the most common insects across the northern hemisphere. Adults can be found in flowers feasting on pollen, and the detritivorous larvae are often inhabitants of homes and buildings. If you’d like to see one of these yourself, check your window sills- there’s a…

Podabrus sp. Soldier Beetle Urbana, Illinois Last week we featured a larval soldier beetle. Today we have an adult of the same family (Cantharidae), in the genus Podabrus. photo details: Canon EOS 50D camera Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens ISO 100, f/13, 1/250sec

This velvety worm-like creature may not look like a beetle, but it is. Beetles are like butterflies, passing through a complex metamorphosis on the way to adulthood, and this insect is the larval stage of a soldier beetle. photo details: Canon EOS 50D camera Canon MP-E 65mm 1-5x macro lens ISO 100, f/13, 1/250sec

Philothermus glabriculus (Cerylonidae) Urbana, Illinois A while back I noted that, at a rate of one beetle per week, I’d need about 10,000 years to get through all the described species. Since I made that comment we’re getting closer to needing only 9,999 years, but if the Coleopterists keep discovering new ones I’m not sure…

This week was warm enough to go insect hunting in the yard, so the Friday beetle is back with new material.  I snapped a few shots of this little staphylinid under a brick, figuring I’d identify it later. That turned out to be a more complicated process than I’d anticipated.

If you peel back the bark of an old stump in the forests of western North America, there’s a good chance you’ll find some of these attractive tank-like insects. This is Ostoma pippingskoeldi, a predatory beetle in the family Trogossitidae. They lurk about under bark searching for soft-bodied prey, including the larvae of other beetles.…

We here at Myrmecos Blog don’t care to voice our opinion of talk show host Glenn Beck. But we are rather enamored of dung beetles, those gorgeously ornamented insects who prevent the world from being buried in feces. Thus, we were pleased to find the following Facebook project in our inbox this weekend: Can This…