Neuron Culture

Archives for August, 2008

You can’t make this stuff up. From Very Short List: Science Brian May, the bushy-haired guitarist for Queen, recently completed his astrophysics thesis, which he began in the early 1970s as a grad student at Imperial College in London. Although May was a promising young scientist, he decided to take a break from research in…

A couple of the shinier stones I’ve come across on the web lately: Somatosphere is a new blog about medical anthropology (think sociology and politics of medicine, only with a bit more critical distance; it’s about how culture shapes medicine) written by McGill University post-doc Eugene Raikhel and others. They’re just getting started but already…

Walter Benjamin’s Writing Tips

Walter Benjamin is a very interesting writer, with a wild range of work (music, Marx, hashish, much much more), a highly distinctive style and one of those early-20th-century European lives that seems impossibly full of intense cultural force and historical fate; his memoir of his youth, Berlin Childhood Around 1900, is particularly affecting, and painful…

When I called out a Scientific American post yesterday about a rise in measles cases because of unvaccinated children, I forgot to include a link to a longer story on the same issue that ran in the NY Times. It’s short, but worth a look as well: Measles Cases Grow in Number, and Officials Blame…

Surgeon, attributed to Jan Sanders van Hemessen, c. 1550. Museo del Prado, Madrid Over at Biophemera, a ScienceBlog I’ve somehow overlooked to date, biologist and artist Jessica Palmer ponders a question raised by a number of Renaissance paintings depicting surgeons removing “stones of madness” from patients’s skulls: Did surgeons (or quacks) sham these operations? It’s…

This one’s causing a dust-up over at the Scientific American’s “60-Second Science” blog Measles is back, and it’s because your kids aren’t vaccinatedDavid Biello If you didn’t vaccinate your kids, you too could find yourself partly responsible for the resurgence of a disease thought eliminated in 2000. Measles—a highly contagious disease-causing virus—is making a comeback…

What’s the world coming to? This irresistible news nugget comes from Al Tompkins at Poynter Online: Beer Kegs Attract Thieves USA Today said: Across the country, crooks are snatching stainless steel kegs in alleyways behind bars and breweries or not returning them after keggers to sell for scrap metal. The trend comes as the stainless…

Math Prof Jobs Go Unfilled (sort of)

And not-so-good news. As much of the math instruction in my own hometown school district (which was recently ranked as one of the best in the nation) is abysmal, news about poor math skills and instruction catches my eye. The news below, from Science, adds to the growing pile.  U.S. HIGHER EDUCATION: Departments Scramble to…

And some good news, from Inside Higher Ed: ‘U.S. News’ Sees Drop in Participation Even though many colleges will boast today about their placement in the annual rankings by U.S. News & World Report, more colleges than ever are declining to participate in the survey that makes up the single largest part of the magazine’s…

from the NY Times: Sour Grapes The news that Wine Spectator magazine was scammed into giving an Award of Excellence to a non-existent restaurant has been greeted with guffaws by schadenfreude fans and with fury by the magazine’s editor. But longtime readers of the Dining section might have seen this coming. Five years ago Amanda…