Neuron Culture

Archives for October, 2009

Top 5 Neuron Culture Posts for October

A bit early yet, but as I’m traveling the rest of the month, here’s my top 5 over the last month. 1. The Weird History of Adjuvants, in which we ponder the inclusion of eye of newt and such in vaccines, and the strangeness of the fact that dirty is good. 2. Why is the…

In a disturbing post at ScienceInsider, Jon Cohen and Martin Enserink explain why the swine flu vaccine is running so late. Or at least they try to explain why it’s so late. For while all the suppliers are running into problems, we’re not allowed to know what they are. The delays are substantial and critical.…

Nurses and doctors have won a victory in their battle for their “right” to infect patients with easily prevented pandemic influenza. Judge Halts Flu Vaccine Mandate For Health Workers via pandemicchronicle.com Posted via web from David Dobbs’s Somatic Marker

“Book Launch 2.0″ This kills me — but maybe just because I’ve written books. (Oh yeah — the links to the books. First two here. Reef Madness here. Buy ‘em. Read ‘em. They’re better than the stuff you’re reading now.) This video should follow or be followed by Ellis Weiner’s “Our Marketing Plan” from the…

1. The tireless, and occasionally tiresome, advocacy on behalf of liberal bloggers and interest groups for the public option. Whatever you think of their tactics — I haven’t always agreed with them — the sheer amount of focus and energy expended on their behalf has been very important, keeping the issue alive in the public…

Don’t see this every day. From the excellent Dovdox, Alan Dove’s scijo blog: Awhile back, I commented on the finding that abandoned swimming pools at foreclosed houses are producing a boom in mosquito-borne infections. Now, it seems, some Floridians have found a way to deal with at least one aspect of the abandoned pool problem:…

via press.princeton.edu I am extremely pleased to report that my friend Adrienne Mayor’s riveting (if queasy-making) biography of Mitradates, “Poison King,” is a finalist for the National Book Award. It’s wonderful to see a skillfully executed and absorbing account of an obscure bit of history get this sort of well-deserved attention. Congratulations, Adrienne. And to…

“The Brite Nightgown,” from Donald Fagen’s First And Only Solo Tour (2006) – Dana Blankenhorn, who brings a distinctive mix of skepticism, intelligence, and gruff impatience to his flu coverage, digests some unsettling stats from the JAMA articles. Some of his highlights: * Health care workers get little protection from fancy masks. Workers given ordinary…

Anatomy of Japanese folk monsters

For its pure strangeness. The Makura-gaeshi (”pillow-mover”) is a soul-stealing prankster known for moving pillows around while people sleep. The creature is invisible to adults and can only be seen by children. Anatomical features include an organ for storing souls stolen from children, another for converting the souls to energy and supplying it to the…

Mount Pisgah, diving into Lake Willoughby, way up noth Vermont, my chosen and beloved place of residence, took the top spot last week in the Commonwealth’s “State Scorecard” for healthcare, which ranks states based on access, quality, costs, and health outcomes. For people who live elsewhere, this report adds one more thing to add to…