Neuron Culture

Archives for October, 2009

Charlie Houston, right, in 1936 with Pasang Kikuli (center) and British climbing legend Bill Tilman I used to do a bit of climbing and a lot of climbing reading — a deep and rich literature. If you read much about American climbing history, you’ll read about Charlie Houston, who made one of the most dramatic…

The healthcare debate in Lincoln, NE, earlier this year. photo: Nat Harnik, AP, via the NY Times The tone of discussions of reform in both Congress and the blogosphere has changed remarkably over the last few days. It’s gone from pessimistic to optimistic, and from a sense of retreat and a whittling away of substantive…

Probably dreaming. But these the rise of the public option and the fade of the flu sometimes seem so real. swine flu, public option, healthcare reform

Ezra Klein thinks it might. “We’re America,” Max Baucus likes to say. “Which means we have to write a uniquely American solution.” But the health-care solution that actually seems to be emerging in Congress — which looks like the health-care solutions proposed by Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton and John Edwards during the campaign — isn’t…

Some things you can’t hear too many times. By Jacob Goldstein If there’s any way out of our current health-care morass, it’s this: In health care, more expensive care is often no better than less expensive care. We were reminded of this fact by a front-page story in this morning’s WSJ, which points out that…

The Power of Anecdote

The morning papers are filled with relevant health reform stories, but two stand out. They weren’t reported by journalists, but were experience-based opinion pieces offered by people on the front lines of delivering and insuring health care. The first comes from the Washington Post, where a family practice physician reports on the battery of tests…

A few years ago, a friend of mine gave birth to a daughter, her second child. A few weeks into the child’s life, it became apparent she was suffering from cerebral palsy. Not long after, my friend, whom I’ll call Carol, bumped into her ob/gyn doctor on the street and told him about her daughter’s…

I’ve wondered many times, including out loud in Slate, why it’s not common in the U.S. to give flu vaccinations at schools, so they could efficiently be given to the population (children) whose inoculation most effectively prevents epidemics or pandemics, as well as to anyone else who wanted one. Same place, procedure, and personnel every…

Never know what’ll top the charts. Top post was a post I put up in January, “Pfizer takes $2.3 billion offl-label marketing fine.” That post reported the news (via FiercePharma) that Pfizer had tucked away in its financial disclosure forms a $2.3 billion charge to end the federal investigation into allegations of off-label promotions of…

Ruth may or may not have called his. But former player and Mariners announcer Mike Blowers, asked before the game for his prediction of the game, predicted a rookie player would hit a homer — his first in the bigs — into the second deck in left-center in his second at-bat on a 3-1 fastball.…