Neuron Culture

Archives for January, 2010

Me (right) hypnotizing Carl Zimmer just before the Rebooting Science Journalism session at ScienceOnline 2010. It worked. Carl had planned to use his 5 minutes to just say, “We are DOOOMED.” Instead he talked about duck sex. I’ve been meaning for two weeks now to post on ScienceOnline 2010 and the Rebooting Science Journalism session,…

The Rise Of Marketing-Based Medicine 64 Comments By Ed Silverman // January 28th, 2010 // 7:57 am You’ve heard of evidence-based medicine. Well, a new paper summarizes a panoply of practices employed over the past two decades or so – ghostwriting, suppressing or spinning data, disease mongering and managing side effect perceptions among docs –…

Hits of the week past

Hits of the week: Savage Minds (with a spiffy website redesign) asks Why is there no Anthropology Journalism? Jerry Coyne takes sharp exception to both a paper and a SciAm Mind Matters article by Paul Andrews and Andy Thomson arguing that depression might be an evolutionary adaptation. Dr. Pangloss punches back. (NB: 1. I was…

Above: Kasparov after his first meeting with Deep Blue, in 1997, when he crushed DP. Later it wouldn’t go so well. In a splendid article in the NY Review of books, former world chess champion Gary Kasparov ponders the limitations of technology as a means of playing chess truly well. When I hit this paragraph…

We’re not on health care now,” Mr. Reid said. “We’ve talked a lot about it in the past. via nytimes.com With friends like this … Posted via web from David Dobbs’s Somatic Marker

Neuroskeptic ponders the growing evidence that antidepressants significantly best placebo only in the more (or most) depressed patients. His take is that: antidepressants treat classical clinical depression, of the kind that psychiatrists in 1960 would have recognized. This is the kind of depression that they were originally used for, after all, because the first antidepressants…

In my “Atlantic article on the genetic roots of stable-versus-reactive temperaments, I noted that the key gene variants linked to these traits appeared to have developed over only the last 50,000-100,000 years — a short time in evolutionary time. That same idea is developed in Cochran and Harpending’s “The 10,000-year Explosion.” Here Razib at Gene…

We don’t have a government-run system. But our system is so expensive that our government’s partial role is pricier than the whole of government-run systems. via voices.washingtonpost.com Absorb that: Our supposedly efficient supposedly free-market healthcare system costs us more in government spending alone than other countries spend on government-run systems. Posted via web from David…

This is a pretty big deal if it holds up in future trials. One caveat I’ve not had time to check out is whether the morphine was often applied as part of an more robust medical response in general, which itself might reduce later PTSD symptoms. I hope the DOD soon follows up with another,…

Tomorrow I fly to North Carolina for the ScienceOnline 2010 conference, or unconference, where on Saturday I will sit down with Ed Yong, Carl Zimmer, John Timmer, and anyone else who squeezes into the room, to talk about rebooting science journalism. The obvious assumption behind the topic (if I can return to the titular metaphor)…