Neuron Culture

Archives for June, 2010

One path to the Nobel

At the age of 21, as a Moeid, I believed that behind every universal phenomenon there must be beauty and simplicity in its description via nobelprize.org Ahmed Zewail, who won a 1999 Nobel for his work chemistry, wrote a quite charming memoir for the Nobel site. Posted via web from David Dobbs’s Somatic Marker

Fungus amongus & other gleanings

    Fungis Danicis, a lovely collection at the beautiful Bibliodyysey Mind Hacks offers a reminder (we can’t get too many) that expressions of distress vary across culture and history. Separately he considers an interesting study showing that Tylenol reduces the pain of social rejection. Neurophilosophy has a post listing several fine New Neuroblogs NeuroDojo ponders…

Last week’s spat between Nicholas Carr and Steven Pinker generated a lot of attention — and, happily, delivered a couple of the more lucid framings yet of the debate over whether digital culture makes us shallow, as Carr argues in his new book, or simply represents yet another sometimes-distracting element that we can learn to deal with, as…

Ozzy Osbourne, preparing to grasp the meaning of his genome. There’s been much attention lately to the failure of genomics advances to create many medical advances. From rock’n’roll comes  hope. THE mystery of why Ozzy Osbourne is still alive after decades of drug and alcohol abuse may finally be solved. The 61-year-old former Black Sabbath…

The New York Review goes bloggy

A still from Visconti’s The Leopard, via NYRB This is not new, but seems to me overlooked (and underlinked) in the blogosphere: The New York Review of Books — a long, longtime favorite of mine — has a blog stable that offers a nice variety of goodies. The current line-up gives a sense of the range: a piece on…

    A clever fellow named Eric Fischer tapped Flickr geotag data to map where locals and tourists take photos in major cities. Above — the wiggly Thames declares it instantly to lovers of this city — is London, where I’m moving (for a time, anyway) in just a few weeks. Blue denotes photos taken…

    Unbelieveble! Department, via SciencePunk:  Giant mayfly swarm caught on radar NYRB reviews what sounds like an especially moving memoir from Andre Agassi. Whatever It Takes Department, via Ed Yong: Superstitions can improve performance by boosting confidence. The climate-change doubt industry and its roots – http://bit.ly/an4cAr, via @stevesilberman RitaRubin: Study: Have bad habits? U r…

iPad, therefore iKludge

  Don DeLillo’s Players, as marked up by David Foster Wallace.Courtesy Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. I just sat down to air a complaint about reading on the iPad when I discovered that Sue Halpern had done much of my work for me: For all its supposed interactivity, the iPad is a surprisingly…

  The photo above isone of several posted by NeuroDojo, who has a lovely post on them. Genetic Future ponders the 23andMe Oops-wrong-data event. Turns out it was a flipped tray. “I’m frankly astonished that this was possible at an accredited genotyping facility – plate-flipping is an age-old problem, but trivial to prevent with good plate/machine…

Are we living in a neuroculture?

Andrew Carnie, Magic Forest, 2002, via Neuroculture.org   Do we live in a neuroculture? Of course we do! Coming from a blog named Neuron Culture, this is obviously a set-up question — my excuse to call attention to a post by Daniel Buchman that offers a brief review article on the question. It seems that…