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Neuron Culture

Category archives for Books

  You just never know what’ll catch fire. Then again, maybe I should have figured “Ozzy Osbourne” and “genome” would have. In any case, Ozzy simply buried every other contender this past month, racking up 7 times as many hits as any other entry ever did in one month — and accounting for two-thirds of…

Every time I read David Foster Wallace, I think, that’s just classic David Foster Wallace. Which is to say it’s completely unexpected, novel, different from the way almost anyone else thinks, including David Foster Wallace the last time I read him. This is a fun review in the NY Review of Books of a book…

What glitters in the net today

I’m ‘posed to be writing, really writing (insert argument over what’s really writing in comments), but hit so many juicy bits in my morning read today I wanted to share. Here’s my eclectic mix for the day: A great rompy scary post from @susanorlean on how her book bounced around many publishers and editors. Keith…

  Jonah Lehrer has a nice post elaborating on his Barnes & Noble review of Clay Shirky’s Cognitive Surplus. Like me, Lehrer finds alluring and valuable Shirky’s central point, which is that the net is harnessing in constructive form a lot of time and energy that we appear to have been wasting watching TV. Yet…

The New York Review goes bloggy

A still from Visconti’s The Leopard, via NYRB This is not new, but seems to me overlooked (and underlinked) in the blogosphere: The New York Review of Books — a long, longtime favorite of mine — has a blog stable that offers a nice variety of goodies. The current line-up gives a sense of the range: a piece on…

iPad, therefore iKludge

  Don DeLillo’s Players, as marked up by David Foster Wallace.Courtesy Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. I just sat down to air a complaint about reading on the iPad when I discovered that Sue Halpern had done much of my work for me: For all its supposed interactivity, the iPad is a surprisingly…

Are we living in a neuroculture?

Andrew Carnie, Magic Forest, 2002, via Neuroculture.org   Do we live in a neuroculture? Of course we do! Coming from a blog named Neuron Culture, this is obviously a set-up question — my excuse to call attention to a post by Daniel Buchman that offers a brief review article on the question. It seems that…

Selling a work fiction is difficult; publishing in Nature is a long-shot; yet somehow writer and genomeboy Misha Angrist managed to publish fiction in Nature. The only way I was ever going to get a first-author publication in Nature [Angrist explains] was if I just made it all up. So that’s what I did. Hat tip to David Dobbs…

via Alexis Madrigal’s Tumblr. Go now. Take the journey. You will also find Herzog reading Curious George and Madeleine.

Ravens via PDPhoto Ravens show that consoling one another is also for the birds, Yet another finding that other species have qualities previously thought uniquely human. Our greatest distinction is that we’re highly social. Yet in that we’ve got a lot of company.   Human brains excel at detecting cheaters. FMRI’s, not so much, says Vaughan Bell…