Brains and minds

Neuron Culture

Category archives for Brains and minds

Are we living in a neuroculture?

Andrew Carnie, Magic Forest, 2002, via Neuroculture.org   Do we live in a neuroculture? Of course we do! Coming from a blog named Neuron Culture, this is obviously a set-up question — my excuse to call attention to a post by Daniel Buchman that offers a brief review article on the question. It seems that…

In reverse order: 5.  David Sloan Wilson, pissing off the angry atheists. “I piss off atheists more than any other category, and I am an atheist.” This sparked some lively action in the comments. 4. Lively or not, Wilson and Dawkins lost fourth place to snail jokes. A turtle gets mugged by a gang of snails. …

  A press release about Snails on methamphetamines works for me.  The story is about memory. The jokes are about snails:   Snail Joke #1 A turtle gets mugged by a gang of snails. Cop is interviewing the turtle afterwards, still at the scene. Turtle still flustered. Cop asks, “Just start at the beginning.” “I don’t know,” says…

The Divided House of Psychiatry

Danny Carlat reports a stimulating time at the recent American Psychiatric Association meeting in New Orleans: She took a look at my name tag, and said, “Oh, I’ve heard about you.”Since her expression was somewhere between stern and outright hostile, I queried, “In a good way or a bad way?”“In a bad way, to tell you…

Here’s what I distracted myself with this morning. Don’t mix these at home. Wired Sci examines how Testosterone Makes People Suspicious of One Another. And that’s a hell of a photo. New Flu Vaccines Could Protect Against All Strains If all goes well, of course. Not to count on at this point, but an interesting look…

At Biophemera, Jessica Palmer takes a look at Mechanical Brides of the Uncanny. Actually a couple look to me a bit like cans.  Like most junk science that just won’t die, the polygraph stays with us. Even Aldrich Ames could see the polygraph was junk. NB, those who don’t shy from no-lie fMRI. From the wonderful…

Selling a work fiction is difficult; publishing in Nature is a long-shot; yet somehow writer and genomeboy Misha Angrist managed to publish fiction in Nature. The only way I was ever going to get a first-author publication in Nature [Angrist explains] was if I just made it all up. So that’s what I did. Hat tip to David Dobbs…

David Sloan Wilson, an atheist himself, has a few things to relate to ‘angry atheists’ like Richard Dawkins. I piss off atheists more than any other category, and I am an atheist. One of the things that infuriates me about the newest crop of angry atheists, such as Richard Dawkins, is their denial of the…

Lights, genes, action

  Two or three years ago, Emory neurologist Helen Mayberg, whose experiments using deep-brain stimulation for depression I check in on now and then, told me that Karl Deisseroth’s work using light to fiddle with brain circuits had huge potential both as a replacement for DBS and for much else. As Lizzie Buchen ably reports in Nature,…

  Phineas Gage enjoys an unfortunate fame in neuroscience circles: After a 5-foot iron tamping rod blew through his head one September afternoon in 1848, the once amiable and capable railroad foreman became a uncouth ne-er-do-well — and Exhibit A in how particular brain areas tended to specialize in particular tasks. (In his case, the…