Digital culture

Neuron Culture

Category archives for Digital culture

  You just never know what’ll catch fire. Then again, maybe I should have figured “Ozzy Osbourne” and “genome” would have. In any case, Ozzy simply buried every other contender this past month, racking up 7 times as many hits as any other entry ever did in one month — and accounting for two-thirds of…

Reading isn’t just a monkish pursuit: Matthew Battles on “The Shallows” » Nieman Journalism Lab More on Carr’s ideas from “The Shallows” BoraZ interviews Eric Roston and gets some good ideas about journalism and reporting, past, present and future. The Cure for Creative Blocks? Leave Your Desk. Or why my move to London is a…

Research Digest blog, the highly useful and content-rich site that tracks all things psych, just opened its “The Bloggers Behind the Blogs,” series, which will run ten interviews with bloggers of mind and brain. It’s with a nice interview of Jesse Bering, of Bering in Mind. It’s a dandy line-up (of which I’m happy to…

  Jonah Lehrer has a nice post elaborating on his Barnes & Noble review of Clay Shirky’s Cognitive Surplus. Like me, Lehrer finds alluring and valuable Shirky’s central point, which is that the net is harnessing in constructive form a lot of time and energy that we appear to have been wasting watching TV. Yet…

Last week’s spat between Nicholas Carr and Steven Pinker generated a lot of attention — and, happily, delivered a couple of the more lucid framings yet of the debate over whether digital culture makes us shallow, as Carr argues in his new book, or simply represents yet another sometimes-distracting element that we can learn to deal with, as…

The New York Review goes bloggy

A still from Visconti’s The Leopard, via NYRB This is not new, but seems to me overlooked (and underlinked) in the blogosphere: The New York Review of Books — a long, longtime favorite of mine — has a blog stable that offers a nice variety of goodies. The current line-up gives a sense of the range: a piece on…

iPad, therefore iKludge

  Don DeLillo’s Players, as marked up by David Foster Wallace.Courtesy Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas at Austin. I just sat down to air a complaint about reading on the iPad when I discovered that Sue Halpern had done much of my work for me: For all its supposed interactivity, the iPad is a surprisingly…

  When Jessica Palmer gave a talk at the “Unruly Democracy” conference last month, she gave what appears, from her after-the-fact blog post excerpted here, to have been a semi-contrarian take on blogospheric civiility: What I did endeavor to convey in my brief talk was the difficulty of blogging on interdisciplinary borders, where science meets…

Here’s what I distracted myself with this morning. Don’t mix these at home. Wired Sci examines how Testosterone Makes People Suspicious of One Another. And that’s a hell of a photo. New Flu Vaccines Could Protect Against All Strains If all goes well, of course. Not to count on at this point, but an interesting look…

I’ve been deemed a pusher, and that’s a good thing. The accuser is Colin Schultz, a busy, curious, and inquisitive young journalist who awarded a story of mine his first annual prize for “push” science journalism. First of all let me say I’m pleased, mainly because the story, ” A Depression Switch?”, about neurologist Helen Mayberg’s experiment using deep brain…