Environment/nature

Neuron Culture

Category archives for Environment/nature

Don’t see this every day. From the excellent Dovdox, Alan Dove’s scijo blog: Awhile back, I commented on the finding that abandoned swimming pools at foreclosed houses are producing a boom in mosquito-borne infections. Now, it seems, some Floridians have found a way to deal with at least one aspect of the abandoned pool problem:…

Bloggingheads.tv just posted a conversation Greg Laden and I had about the second-biggest scientific controversy of Darwin’s time, and of Darwin’s life: the argument over how coral reefs form. The coral reef argument was fascinating in its own right, both scientifically and dramatically — for here a very capable andn conscientious scientist, Alexander Agassiz, struggled…

photo: U.S. Forest Service Notables of the day: John Hawks ponders the (bad) art of citing papers you’ve never read. Clive Thompson ponders the new literacy spawned of engagement with many keyboards. A poll on public education shows how much opinion depends on framing, context — and who else thinks an idea is good. In…

Reef sightings

I was pleased to see my book Reef Madness: Charles Darwin, Alexander Agassiz, and the Meaning of Coral written up in a couple of venues recently. Over at The Primate Diaries, Eric Michael Johnson, who does on history and philosophy of science, looks at the “terrific argument” that the book follows — an argument simultaneously…

In case you missed them (or miss them, and want to read again …) The (Illusory) Rise and Fall of the “Depression Gene” DIY circumcision with nail clippers Go figure. Oliver Sacks meets Jon Stewart Wheels come off psychiatric manual; APA blames road conditions Alarming climate change chart of the day Swine flu count in…

Among the many treats in Carl Zimmer’s new Times piece on fireflies and sex — go, and be enchanted — I particularly liked this quick peek at how a life and a career can take a sharp turn for the most unplanned of reasons: It was on a night much like this one in 1980…

Paul Krugman tunes out the noise: Temperature is a noisy time series, so if you pick and choose your dates over a short time span you can usually make whatever case you want. That’s why you need to look at longer trends and do some statistical analysis. But I thought that it would be a…

Much much much ado on the web this week, on the too-many fronts I try to visit. From my list of notables: Carl Zimmer, who clearly doesn’t sleep, writes up a nice post about a Nature paper announcing Limusaurus, a newly discovered fossil that is, Zimmer notes, is “not — I repeat NOT — the…

Cougar takes a dip (really)

You don’t see this every day.

Perhaps because I so enjoyed the time I spent at sea learning about fish, I particularly enjoyed this collection of Nick Cobbing’s photos of ice, sea, and people who work them — scientists, fishermen, adventurers. Cobbing has a great eye for color and form, particularly those of the icy north and the sea; his study…