Science policy

Neuron Culture

Category archives for Science policy

Reading the Mindreading Studies – Science Progress seeks a handle on fMRI hype, hope, and horizons The evolving Swine Flu story [Effect Measure] The skinny on a scary run of deadly swine flu, from people who’ve been doing this a while. Green Issues Fade Is green losing its lustre? Eli Lilly Tops List of Drug-Company…

As the comments and correspondence about my PTSD story and posts accrue, I’ve been pondering ways to pull out some of the most interesting, powerful, and affecting. I finally decided to just start posting some, sometimes with commentary, sometimes without. This is a story of many different colors and textures.   I’ll start with this excerpt…

Doctors and torture, cont’d

Earlier today I drew attention to a post by Questionable Authority on The Torture Memos, Medical “Professionals”, and the Hippocratic Oath. Says Mike, I cannot remember ever in my life being as ashamed of my country as I am at this moment. The contents of the memos are so insanely wrong that I’d like to…

Ed Yong examines how a simple writing exercise helps break vicious cycle that holds back black students. The Questionable Authority considers The Torture Memos, Medical “Professionals”, and the Hippocratic Oath. Jessica Palmer, in a healthy display of online media’s corrective power, tries to make clear that For the last time: that “Twitter is Evil” paper…

When you propose that we are overdiagnosing PTSD in vets, you run into not only a lot of flak but many offerings of evidence suggesting that we’re missing a lot of cases. Since publishing my article on PTSD, I’ve received those arguments directly in comments, and on Wednesday, April 8, Salon published an article, “I…

Skip this post if you don’t want to read a writer responding point by point to a self-indulgent, insubstantial attack by a major academic. I should say right off that I’ve long admired the more measured critiques that J. Douglas Bremner, a PTSD researcher and professor of radiology and psychiatry at Emory University, has offered…

It didn’t take long for my Scientific American story on PTSD to draw the sort of fire I expected. A doctor blogging as “egalwan” at Follow Me Here writes [Dobbs] is critical of a culture which “seemed reflexively to view bad memories, nightmares and any other sign of distress as an indicator of PTSD.” To…

Below are materials supplementing my story “The Post-Traumatic Stress Trap,” Scientific American, April 2009. (You can find the story here and my blog post introducing it here.) I’m starting with annotated sources, source materials, and a bit of multimedia. I hope to add a couple sidebars that didn’t fit in the main piece — though…

“How We Decide” author Jonah Lehrer, fresh from a book tour of the UK, offers what he calls a “spluttering answer” (it’s really quite lucid) to a question he says he’s getting a lot these days: What decision-making errors were involved in our current financial meltdown?? The short version of his answer — well worth…

“Primates on Facebook” — “Even online, the neocortex is the limit” to how many people we can really have as friends. People who use more textual shortcuts (lk whn they txt in skl) when texting have higher reading skills. The coverage seems to assume this is causal, but it’s almost surely just an association —…