Medicine

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Category archives for Medicine

I’ve wondered many times, including out loud in Slate, why it’s not common in the U.S. to give flu vaccinations at schools, so they could efficiently be given to the population (children) whose inoculation most effectively prevents epidemics or pandemics, as well as to anyone else who wanted one. Same place, procedure, and personnel every…

Never know what’ll top the charts. Top post was a post I put up in January, “Pfizer takes $2.3 billion offl-label marketing fine.” That post reported the news (via FiercePharma) that Pfizer had tucked away in its financial disclosure forms a $2.3 billion charge to end the federal investigation into allegations of off-label promotions of…

Flu roundup cont’d

Lots of flu news out there. Here’s my short list for the day: Helen Branswell reports that WHO is unpersuaded by the unpublished paper showing seasonal flu vaccine may raise chance of getting swine flu. (Anomalies are usually anomalies.) Canada has been thrown into quite a bit of confusion by this report, with some provinces…

Last week the Times ran a story by Andrew Pollack, Benefit and Doubt in Vaccine Additive, that covered some of the ground I trod in my Slate story, “To Boost or Not to Boost: The United States’ swine flu vaccines will leave millions worldwide unprotected. Pollack also had the room to explore something I lacked…

At Gene Expression, Razib casts a skeptical eye on a study of the neuroanatomical variability of religiosity. The brain areas identified in this and the parallel fMRI studies are not unique to processing religion [the study states], but play major roles in social cognition. This implies that religious beliefs and behavior emerged not as sui…

Much ado about swine flu

The swine flu triage tent at Dell’s Children’s Medical Center, in Austin, Texasphoto: Ralph Barerra, Austin American-Statesman I can’t keep up with the flu news. (If you want to, best single bet — the wide net — is Avian Flu Diary.) But as the World Health Organisation meets in Hong-Kong to discuss, among other things, swine…

Misdiagnosing the live and the dead

“One in six patients ‘wrongly diagnosed by NHS doctors’,” shouts the Daily Mail (via EvidenceMatters. This should not surprise us: Autopsies have been finding a similar percentage of misdiagnosis among the dead for decades. Doctors will always miss some diagnoses. Progress is a matter of ever narrowing the list of things doctors miss — so…

My latest piece for Slate examines the unsettling consequences of the United States’ choice of swine flu vaccines. The good news about these vaccines is that, to judge by the first vaccine trial results, published last week, they appear to work fast, safely — and at about a half to a quarter of the doses…

I regret I can’t treat at more, um, length, the following weighty matters: Size Matters; So Do Lies   Nate Silver finds that Matt Kibbe, the president of FreedomWorks, speaking of the 9/12 tea party rally in DC, ” did the equivalent of telling people that his penis is 53 inches long.” Dr. Nobody Again Questions…

via youtube.com As Gooznews (h/t) put it, “This says it all.” My own rant will come later. Posted via web from David Dobbs’s Somatic Marker