Pharma

Neuron Culture

Category archives for Pharma

OK. Animals first, then everybody else. (Other) Animals Want Your Own Dinosaur? Place Your Bids Jellyfish numbers rise  My son and I saw this last year when we were at the EuroScience conference (highly recomennded) in Barcelona (ditto). The beaches had warnings of whole rafts of these. Determined to get wet in the Med, I…

I regret I can’t treat at more, um, length, the following weighty matters: Size Matters; So Do Lies   Nate Silver finds that Matt Kibbe, the president of FreedomWorks, speaking of the 9/12 tea party rally in DC, ” did the equivalent of telling people that his penis is 53 inches long.” Dr. Nobody Again Questions…

Frederic Curtiss, editor-in-chief of the Journal of Managed Care Pharmacy, told Reuters Health that data attached to documents by Word has allowed him to discover undisclosed contributors. In one case, for instance, a revised manuscript arrived at his office with four named authors, but when he examined the metadata, he discovered an additional author was…

Ghostwriting gone wild

Oh lordy, this is not good: The Times reports that up to 11% of the articles in leading med journals were writtne at least partly by ghostwriters.  Via Gary Schwitzer at http://blog.lib.umn.edu/schwitz/healthnews/2009/09/who-you-gonna-c.html Posted via email from David’s posterous

Ed Yong, echoed by Mike the Mad biologist PhysioProf asks what the heck investigative science journalism would look like. I hope to write more extensively on this soon. In the meantime, a few observations: To ponder this question — and to do investigative reporting — I think it helps to have a sense of the…

Scientific American has a good story by Edmund S. Higgins suggesting that might be the case. As the story notes, the evidence for such a toll is still preliminary. But the story’s opening, which tells of a parent seemingly overeager to medicate a child who didn’t need it, gives an idea of why the question…

I have suspected for some time now that the band oddly close process designed to produce the DSM-V — the diagnostic statistical manual that is psychiatry’s diagnostic guide and Bible — would create an explosion of some sort. But I didn’t think it would explode quite so soon. As Daniel Carlat outlines in a wonderful…

Much much much ado on the web this week, on the too-many fronts I try to visit. From my list of notables: Carl Zimmer, who clearly doesn’t sleep, writes up a nice post about a Nature paper announcing Limusaurus, a newly discovered fossil that is, Zimmer notes, is “not — I repeat NOT — the…

Neuroskeptic offers an elegant unpeeling of a study seeming specifically designed to find a marketing-friendly distinction for a drug — Abilify — otherwise undistinguished. Suppose you were a drug company, and you’ve invented a new drug. It’s OK, but it’s no better than the competition. How do you convince people to buy it? You need…

What’s wrong — but horribly expected — in this picture? One week the CEO of Lilly attacks the idea of a public health insurance plan because it might reduce consumers’ “ability to choose, in an informed way, from all the available alternatives.” The next week, PhRMA, the trade group this CEO’s company is a part…