Sports

Neuron Culture

Category archives for Sports

CNN has a fascinating and rather frightening story about the toll football (or the concussions acquired playing it) take on the brain: But today, using tissue from retired NFL athletes culled posthumously, the Center for the Study of Traumatic Encephalopathy (CSTE) is shedding light on what concussions look like in the brain. The findings are…

The book opens so thrillingly — a plane crash, a last-second Super Bowl victory, and a first chapter that comfortably reconciles Plato and Ovid with Tom Brady and John Madden — that it spawns a worry: Can the book possibly sustain this pace? “How We Decide” delivers. Jonah Lehrer, — author of “Proust Was a…

Now this is serious vertical drop. wingsuit base jumping from doubleA on Vimeo.

As an avid tennis player (though it’s been a while), I had to love this and do: The busy bloggers at Neurophilosophy bring their usual lucidity to a paper by David Whitney, of the University of California, Davis, on how inherent dynamics of visual perception make line-call errors by tennis referees virtually inevitable. Check it…

More questions on cell phone/DNA data

You want mail, write about cell phones and DNA. Earlier today, when I posted a heads-up to a Science story about questions raised about data-tampering in what Science called “The only two peer-reviewed scientific papers” showing strong links between cell phone use and DNA mutations, I noted I was surprised at the lack of press…

Roy Oswalt, bringing it. Some good hits from the last week or so (but not too many off Roy): SCIENTIFIC MISCONDUCT: Fraud Charges Cast Doubt on Claims of DNA Damage From Cell Phone Fields — Vogel 321 (5893): 1144a — Science  As shocking a story as the title suggests. Oops, update: As that story is…

A particularly nice post by the Times’ Tyler Knepper, who keeps the "Bats" blog: Luke Scott explains why hitting is so very difficult. http://bats.blogs.nytimes.com/2008/05/30/why-baseball-really-is-a-game-of-inches/index.html?partner=rssnyt&emc=rss

My (very short) story on a new omnidirectional treadmill for spatial cognition research is up at the Wired site: An Omnidirectional Treadmill Means One Giant Leap for Virtual Reality. …This April, a team based at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany, unveiled the CyberWalk, an omnidirectional treadmill designed to serve as…