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Neuron Culture

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Research Digest has posted an q&a interview with me as part of their The Bloggers Behind the Blog series. Here are a few key tidbits. Do read the rest there, as well as the other interviews already run and to come. On why I write about psychology, psychiatry, and other behavioral sciences: Science constitutes our…

Every time I read David Foster Wallace, I think, that’s just classic David Foster Wallace. Which is to say it’s completely unexpected, novel, different from the way almost anyone else thinks, including David Foster Wallace the last time I read him. This is a fun review in the NY Review of Books of a book…

What glitters in the net today

I’m ‘posed to be writing, really writing (insert argument over what’s really writing in comments), but hit so many juicy bits in my morning read today I wanted to share. Here’s my eclectic mix for the day: A great rompy scary post from @susanorlean on how her book bounced around many publishers and editors. Keith…

Are we living in a neuroculture?

Andrew Carnie, Magic Forest, 2002, via Neuroculture.org   Do we live in a neuroculture? Of course we do! Coming from a blog named Neuron Culture, this is obviously a set-up question — my excuse to call attention to a post by Daniel Buchman that offers a brief review article on the question. It seems that…

In reverse order: 5.  David Sloan Wilson, pissing off the angry atheists. “I piss off atheists more than any other category, and I am an atheist.” This sparked some lively action in the comments. 4. Lively or not, Wilson and Dawkins lost fourth place to snail jokes. A turtle gets mugged by a gang of snails. …

Selling a work fiction is difficult; publishing in Nature is a long-shot; yet somehow writer and genomeboy Misha Angrist managed to publish fiction in Nature. The only way I was ever going to get a first-author publication in Nature [Angrist explains] was if I just made it all up. So that’s what I did. Hat tip to David Dobbs…

Ravens via PDPhoto Ravens show that consoling one another is also for the birds, Yet another finding that other species have qualities previously thought uniquely human. Our greatest distinction is that we’re highly social. Yet in that we’ve got a lot of company.   Human brains excel at detecting cheaters. FMRI’s, not so much, says Vaughan Bell…

I’ve been deemed a pusher, and that’s a good thing. The accuser is Colin Schultz, a busy, curious, and inquisitive young journalist who awarded a story of mine his first annual prize for “push” science journalism. First of all let me say I’m pleased, mainly because the story, ” A Depression Switch?”, about neurologist Helen Mayberg’s experiment using deep brain…

from “Would dew believe it: The stunning pictures of sleeping insects covered in water droplets,” at the Daily Mail Given the day, we find both foolishness and meat. Fun stuff first: Science, Nature Team Up on New Journal – ScienceNOW Does the WTF1 gene trigger the inferior supra-credulus? @edyong209 falls for the whole thing: http://bit.ly/bLlzqx…

from a different Daily Dish – 365 petri dishes, by Klari Reis House of Wisdom, the splendid new blog on Arabic science from Mohammed Yahia, editor of Nature Middle East describes an effort to map the Red Sea’s coral reefs with satellite, aerial, adn ship-based technologies. Nice project and a promising new blog. Brain and…