antidepressants

Neuron Culture

Tag archives for antidepressants

PTSD, pharma, adjuvants, bad movies — these are a few of my favorite things, and readers’ too. What’s Neil doing here? He wasn’t on Neuron Culture; I posted his clip on my catch-all, David Dobbs’s Somatic Marker, because I love him. So he comes first. From 1986. Looks as if he’s having a particularly good…

1. Maybe it was just the headline … but the runaway winner was “No pity party, no macho man.” Psychologist Dave Grossman on surviving killing. Actually I think it was the remarkable photo, which looks like a painting. Check it out. 2. I’m not vulnerable, just especially plastic. Risk genes, environment, and evolution, in the…

Did Antidepressants Depress Japan?

The Kirsch study published a few weeks ago has stirred much discussion of the placebo power of antidepressants (or is it the antidepressant power of placebos?); it’s clear that the act of taking a pill that you expect to help you often does help you. But can the availability of a pill meant for depression…

With so much written here lately about placebos and drug effectiveness, I would not want to leave out this remarkable study: Placebo effect is stronger, apparently, if you pay more for the placebo. This is a fascinating study described in a letter to the Journal of the American Medical Association. A crudely shortened version: Some…

The ripples from the PLOS Medicine antidepressants-don’t-work study by Kirsch et alia, which I covered below, just keep spreading. Those who want to follow it can do well by visiting or bookmarking this search I did (an ingenious Google News search for “Kirsch SSRI”). It seems to be tracking the press coverage pretty well. Note…

I’ve not had time to thoroughly read this yet. But on the heels of another study published a few weeks ago (I blogged on it here) showing that SSRIs have little therapeutic effect if you include the (unflattering) clinical trials the industry had previously hidden, PLOS Medicine now publishes a larger study — a meta-analysis…

I’ve written before, both here and in print, about how FDA policy and drug company practices have allowed drug makers to publish (and the FDA to base approval on) only the most flattering drug-trial results while keeping less-flattering studies in the drawer. Today a New England Journal of Medicine report shows how things change when…