climate change

Neuron Culture

Tag archives for climate change

In case you missed them (or miss them, and want to read again …) The (Illusory) Rise and Fall of the “Depression Gene” DIY circumcision with nail clippers Go figure. Oliver Sacks meets Jon Stewart Wheels come off psychiatric manual; APA blames road conditions Alarming climate change chart of the day Swine flu count in…

Paul Krugman tunes out the noise: Temperature is a noisy time series, so if you pick and choose your dates over a short time span you can usually make whatever case you want. That’s why you need to look at longer trends and do some statistical analysis. But I thought that it would be a…

Science Progress looks at the discouraging feedback loop between climate change and Western wildfires: New research investigating the impact of climate change on western wildfires presents a bleak picture. CAP Senior Fellow Tom Kenworthy covers the latest science in an American Progress column this week, explaining the problematic feedback cycle: higher temperatures from global warming…

Atop other Obama appointments, this is one I suspect America’s scientists will welcome. From the Washington Post: Report: Holdren to Lead White House Science Policy By Joel Achenbach President-elect Obama will announce this weekend that he has selected physicist John Holdren, who has devoted much of his career to energy and environmental research, as his…

A new journal from the Nature Publishing Group (publishers of Nature, Nature Neuroscience, and other favorites of mine) has just started a journal about climate change, and to my delight they feature a story about climate change and Atlantic cod, an old love of mine from my time on the Gulf of Maine. Atlantic cod,…

Don’t count on the tropical forest gobbling up our excess carbon. Such is the warning from a recent study by Harvard’s Kenneth Feeley and others in Ecology Letters, which suggests that we may not be able to count on surging tropical forest growth to slow global warming by consuming some of the excess carbon (via…

Eiger loses face

I enjoy most any mix of science and mountaineering — part of why I so like Mark Bowen’s Thin Ice, his book about climatologist Lonnie Thompson’s remarkable work documenting global warming in high-altitude glaciers. Scientific work done at rarefied altitudes. How can you not like it? The North Face of the Eiger, 2005 — aka…

My interest in global warming grows apace, both because it stands to impose some very grim effects and because it makes an interesting (if dismaying) study in culture’s attitude toward science (see my post on “Climate change as a teset of empiricism and secular democracy“) and how vested interests can affect same. Florida at present…