journalism

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Tag archives for journalism

A food blog I can’t digest

Hoo boy. I never thought I’d have to resign a blogging position in protest. But so I find. I’m dismayed at ScienceBlogs’ decision to run material written by PepsiCo as what amounts to editorial content — equivalent, that is, to the dozens of blogs written by scientists, bloggers, and writers who come with a different,…

  A Happy 4th from Andrew Sullivan: The rise of this type of citizen journalism [i.e., journalism via blogs] has, in my view, increasingly exposed some of the laziness and corruption in the professional version – even as there is still a huge amount to treasure and value in the legacy media, and a huge amount…

  When Jessica Palmer gave a talk at the “Unruly Democracy” conference last month, she gave what appears, from her after-the-fact blog post excerpted here, to have been a semi-contrarian take on blogospheric civiility: What I did endeavor to convey in my brief talk was the difficulty of blogging on interdisciplinary borders, where science meets…

I’ve been deemed a pusher, and that’s a good thing. The accuser is Colin Schultz, a busy, curious, and inquisitive young journalist who awarded a story of mine his first annual prize for “push” science journalism. First of all let me say I’m pleased, mainly because the story, ” A Depression Switch?”, about neurologist Helen Mayberg’s experiment using deep brain…

A few calendar notes: I’ve got a three-day run starting next Sunday in which I’ll be talking to authors and journalists about book proposals; NY science writers about the future of social media; and to genomic geeks about genes and temperament. If you’ve questions you’d like raised at any of these, please shoot me a…

Patty’s Day Roundup

BoingBoing loves The Open Laboratory: The Best in Science Writing on Blogs 2009, founded/published by the ever-present Bora Zivkovic and edited by scicurious. Nice pointer to four entires on weightlessness, major medical troubles, vampires v zombies, and how poverty affects brain development.   Slate’s Sarah Wideman reports that Insurance companies deny fertility treatment coverage to unmarried…

Gold in the tweetstream

I’ll try doing this now and then, maybe regularly, to gather the more notable tweets I get in my twitter feed. Darwin2009: Population-level traits that affect, and do not affect, invasion success http://ow.ly/1mMUp jayrosen_nyu: “The New York Times is now as much a technology company as a journalism company.” <— Bill Keller http://jr.ly/2pfz dhayton: “H-Madness”…

image Bill Waterson Ed Yong, responding to a run of recent rumination about the nature and role of science journalism, ponders the value of the “This is cool” science story: None of this is intended to suggest that “this-is-cool” stories are somehow superior to those explaining the interaction between science, policy and society, or what…

We’ll start with the science, cruise through J school, and end with healthcare reform or bust. Genetic material Willful ignorance is not an effective argument against personal genomics : Genetic Future Mr. McDonald spanks the frightened. The American Scientist, meanwhile, takes a shot at Putting Genes in Perspective Culture and the human genome From the…

Chicago Tribune recently banned (sensibly, it seems) the use of 119 cliched words or phrases in Tribune story. NPR blogger Ian Chillag, who apparently either did not get or badly misread the memo, promptly set about using all 119 in a single sentence . Jump the break (‘read more”) to revel in the whole thing: