neuroscience

Neuron Culture

Tag archives for neuroscience

Are we living in a neuroculture?

Andrew Carnie, Magic Forest, 2002, via Neuroculture.org   Do we live in a neuroculture? Of course we do! Coming from a blog named Neuron Culture, this is obviously a set-up question — my excuse to call attention to a post by Daniel Buchman that offers a brief review article on the question. It seems that…

Lights, genes, action

  Two or three years ago, Emory neurologist Helen Mayberg, whose experiments using deep-brain stimulation for depression I check in on now and then, told me that Karl Deisseroth’s work using light to fiddle with brain circuits had huge potential both as a replacement for DBS and for much else. As Lizzie Buchen ably reports in Nature,…

  Phineas Gage enjoys an unfortunate fame in neuroscience circles: After a 5-foot iron tamping rod blew through his head one September afternoon in 1848, the once amiable and capable railroad foreman became a uncouth ne-er-do-well — and Exhibit A in how particular brain areas tended to specialize in particular tasks. (In his case, the…

Would you believe this brain? Every few months, sometimes more often, someone tries to ramrod fMRI lie detection into the courtrooms. Each time, it gets a little closer. Wired Science carries the latest alarming story: A Brooklyn attorney hopes to break new ground this week when he offers a brain scan as evidence that a…

Kandel on camera

I profiled neuroscientist Eric Kandel for Scientific American Mind a while back; a huge pleasure. Two things stand out.  First, Kandel’s work makes a wonderful foundation for an understanding of neuroscience, as his mid-20th-century insights into the dynamics of memory underlie much of the discipline. Second, Kandel  is a gas — gracious, funny, and stunningly…

Oliver Sacks meets Jon Stewart

Okay, Jonah saw this first — but in case you missed it there, here’s a snip from Jon Stewart interviewing Oliver Sacks about music and the brain. This is a nice meeting. I’ve not met Stewart, but I had the pleasure to spend some time with Sacks while working on a couple stories, and he…

Ezra Klein reviews Obama’s handling of yesterday’s health summit — a piece well worth reading for a taste of how sharply focused and serious Obama is about truly comprehensive health-care reform. Karen Tumlty, a health-care expert, describes in Time her own family’s grueling wrestling match with the health-insurance industry. A timely story — no pun…

I drove up to Montreal yesterday, and amid visits with anthropologist and Somatosphere founder Eugene Raikhel, anthropologist Allan Young, and Suparna Choudhury, talked about (among other things) the emerging new area of study they’re calling “critical neuroscience.” What the heck is critical neuroscience? Well, one definition calls it the attempt to assess and inform neuroscientific…

The book opens so thrillingly — a plane crash, a last-second Super Bowl victory, and a first chapter that comfortably reconciles Plato and Ovid with Tom Brady and John Madden — that it spawns a worry: Can the book possibly sustain this pace? “How We Decide” delivers. Jonah Lehrer, — author of “Proust Was a…

One theory about antidepressants is that they relieve depression by encouraging neurogenesis — the creation of new neurons. Neuroskeptic reviews a study that argues against this idea. the neurogenesis hypothesis has problems of its own. A new paper claims to add to what seems like a growing list of counter-examples: Ageing abolishes the effects of…