Vietnam War

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POWs who weren’t, cont’d

A few weeks ago, when I posted that “Uh-oh: POW benefit claimants exceed recorded POWs, one reader wrote saying the post made her wonder whether I have “a problem with veterans.” As one reader noted, a concern with bogus POWs suggests I have a problem with — well, bogus POWs. Should it not bother us…

One hopes there’s a good explanation for this somewhere: According to this AP story, the number of people collecting VA benefits for being POWs exceeds — by hundreds — the number of actual POWs ever held (much less still alive). From the AP: Prisoners of war suffer in ways most veterans don’t, enduring humiliating forced…

It didn’t take long for my Scientific American story on PTSD to draw the sort of fire I expected. A doctor blogging as “egalwan” at Follow Me Here writes [Dobbs] is critical of a culture which “seemed reflexively to view bad memories, nightmares and any other sign of distress as an indicator of PTSD.” To…

Below are materials supplementing my story “The Post-Traumatic Stress Trap,” Scientific American, April 2009. (You can find the story here and my blog post introducing it here.) I’m starting with annotated sources, source materials, and a bit of multimedia. I hope to add a couple sidebars that didn’t fit in the main piece — though…

My story in the April 2009 Scientific American story, “The Post-Traumatic Stress Trap“, just went online. Here’s the opening: In 2006, soon after returning from military service in Ramadi, Iraq, during the bloodiest period of the war, Captain Matt Stevens of the Vermont National Guard began to have a problem with PTSD, or post-traumatic stress…