Neurontic

Archives for August, 2006

Dear Neurontic

I have some experience with depression, mostly mild although I have had a couple periods that could be described as major depressions. I know that my thoughts are intimately connected to my brain chemistry and that paying attention to how I’m thinking can alter my mood. For example, if I catch myself starting to feel…

Sunday’s Silly Science Roundup

A collection of scientific findings that make you go “duh”–or simply “huh?” It’s been a banner week for sociologists people: Penn State’s Beth Montemurro, assistant professor of sociology, has accomplished something no one thought possible: she’s turned watching stupid television into a respectable profession. After extensive “research,” Montemurro has established beyond a shadow of a…

Much Ado About Area 25

An estimated 16 percent of the American population will suffer from major depressive disorder at some point during life. The disease strikes down nearly 19 million Americans each year, and it’s likely to happen more than once. A whopping 50 percent will experience an encore performance within two years of their initial depressive “episode,” and…

How We Rate Phantom Spaghetti

Okay, clearly Neurontic does not attract the carb-averse. Spaghetti was pretty high up on everyone’s list. Answers ranged from a respectable ‘6’ to a lip-smacking ’10.’ I contacted a few of you to get the specs on your dinners and here’s what I learned: Yez, a reader after my own heart, gave the meal a…

Thought Experiment

I’d like to replicate an experiment I recently read about in Harvard Psychologist Daniel Gilbert’s new book Stumbling On Happiness, a philosophical tract masquerading as a self-help book. Despite residing in the nose bleed section of the ivory tower, Gilbert is a lucid, common-sense thinker with some truly worthwhile insights regarding the human temperament. We’ll…

Sunday’s Silly Science Roundup

A new Neurontic feature, Sunday’s Silly Science Roundup showcases scientific findings that make you go “duh.” After spending a great deal of time and money, a group of researchers at University College London are willing to go out on a limb and say “Irrational Decisions are Based on Emotion.” Hellbent on convincing the two remaining…