Neurophilosophy

Archives for July, 2007

Females have a natural preference for mating with dominant males, because this confers a genetic advantage upon the offspring produced. When selecting a mate, animals rely on chemical cues called pheromones, which relay information about the social status and genetic health of a potential mate. Reproductive success therefore depends upon the encoding and recall of…

Encephalon 28

Encephalon #28 is now online at the Bohemian Scientist‘s blog. The next edition will be hosted at Memoirs of a Postgrad on August 13th. If you’d like to contribute, send permalinks to your neuroscience or psychology blog posts to encephalonb.hoat{at}gmail{dot{com}, or use this submission form. 

Cool 3D medical animation

By Nucleus Medical Art, Inc. There are others on YouTube.

On the peculiarities of the Negro brain

Black peoples’ brains are, of course, no more or less peculiar than those of any other people. The human brain is an extraordinarily complex organ, and there are just as many differences between the brains of people from the same ethnic group as there between the brains of people from different groups. Some racial peculiarities…

The pleasure’s all mine

We had the pleasure of entertaining the delightful Jessica Palmer at our place last night. And earlier today, Jessica and I ate pizza on the King’s Road before visiting the Chelsea Physic Garden. Jessica writes the fantastic Bioephemera blog (where you can read more about her visit to London), and created four of my beautiful…

Music & the mind

This week’s New Yorker contains an article by Oliver Sacks about a condition called musicophilia, in which one feels sudden urges to listen to, or play, music follwing brain injury: In 1994, when Tony Cicoria was forty-two, and a well-regarded orthopedic surgeon, he was struck by lightning. He had an out-of-body experience. “I saw my…

A 3,000-year-old prosthesis

This artificial big toe, which was found on the foot of an ancient Egyptian mummy, has been dated to 1069- 664 BCE, and is on display at the Cairo Museum in Egypt. Researchers from Manchester University’s KNH Centre for Biomedical Egyptology have made a replica of the prosthesis to determine whether or not it was…

Remembering Henry M.

The single most famous case study in the history of neuropsychology is that of an anonymous memory-impaired man usually referred to only by the initials H.M. This patient has one of the most severe cases of amnesia ever observed; he has been followed for over 40 years by more than 100 researchers, and is the…

M.D. vs. quack

Earlier this week, I posted an email I received about a nutritional supplement called EM Power Plus. The makers of this product, a Canadian company called TrueHope, claim that it can alleviate the symptoms of bipolar disorder.   In the comments to that post, PalMD, author of the WhiteCoatUnderground blog, is having what appears to…

Lobotomy & young-earth creationists

My recent post on prefrontal lobotomy has been the most popular thing on this blog so far, and the comments on it are worth reading. While searching for more information about lobotomies and the neuroleptic drugs that replaced them, I came across this fantastic webpage at NobelPrize.org, which contains more information about Egas Moniz, the…