Neurophilosophy

Google Earth image of Moses parting the Red Sea

2121029654_cd3c2edc69_o.jpg

God’s Eye View, which depicts four biblical events as if captured by Google Earth, is the work of The Glue Society, a collective of writers, designers and art/ film directors based in Sydney, Australia.

Says Glue Society member James Dive:

We like to disorientate audiences a little with all our work. And with this piece we felt technology now allows events which may or may not have happened to be visualized and made to appear dramatically real. As a method of representation satellite photography is so trusted; it has been interesting to mess with that trust.

Dive reiterates something I wrote several weeks ago. New research shows that it is incredibly easy to create false memories with doctored photographs. Given the power that images can have over us – something the mass media has known for a long time – should we find it worrying that sophisticated technology for the realistic maipulation of images is cheap and widely available?

Regarding the parting of the Red Sea, I do not believe that the event occurred as depicted in the bible. I do, however, believe that the biblical account of this event is based on something that did happen, as seen through the eyes of technologically primitive people, and as recorded by a group with vested interests.

According to the bible, God parted the Red Sea in order to save Moses and the Israelites from the Pharaoh’s army. But this event, as well all but one of the biblical plagues of Egypt, and the pillar of fire which led Moses and his people to tehe Promised Land, is a cataclysmic mega-tsunami-causing earthquake on the Greek island of Santorini.

Comments

  1. #1 Adrian
    December 18, 2007

    enjoy reading about your beliefs.

  2. #2 Ex-drone
    December 18, 2007

    I do, however, believe that the biblical account of this event is based on something that did happen, as seen through the eyes of technologically primitive people, and as recorded by a group with vested interests.

    Really? Why? Wouldn’t it make more sense to assume that it is just a cultural myth until it is corroborated by another more credible source? This kind of “something must have happened” approach encourages people to contort all sorts of artefacts and evidence into absurd post hoc explanations. How many times have people declared that they have “found with complete certainty” the Christmas star, Atlantis or Noah’s Ark, with no two explanations in agreement?

  3. #3 Martin
    December 18, 2007

    Israeli archaeologists have have been scouring the Egyptian desert for decades, looking for evidence of the exodus. They haven’t found any. It is their professional opinion that the event (wandering through the desert for 40 years) never happened.

    Therefore, the most likely source of the Red Sea story is not “something that did happen.” Rather, it was just made up.

  4. #4 Abbie
    December 18, 2007

    What does #3 show? Angels or birds?

  5. #5 Chuck C
    December 20, 2007

    meh. Cecil B. Demille did it first.

  6. #6 Dave Briggs
    December 20, 2007

    Dive reiterates something I wrote several weeks ago. New research shows that it is incredibly easy to create false memories with doctored photographs. Given the power that images can have over us – something the mass media has known for a long time – should we find it worrying that sophisticated technology for the realistic maipulation of images is cheap and widely available?

    I think what you wrote about is very important! We are going to have to get some branch of science working on finding some way to put time/date stamps or something on documents and photographs that are tamperproof. When having 100 versions of history, we are going to have to be able to provide some way of proving what the real truth of the matter is!
    Dave Briggs :~)
    Dave Briggs

  7. #7 khalid
    December 20, 2007

    It’s actually the Sea of Reeds that Moses is supposed to’ve parted, not the Red Sea. For the Bible and Wikipedia tell me so.

  8. #8 Peter Boston
    December 24, 2007

    It would be rather extraordinary for any archaeologist to claim that he can identify the presence of a specific group of nomads, indistinguishable from any other group of nomads, during a specific 40 year period, in a landscape the changes daily with the wind, which occurred about 3,000 years ago. It is perhaps even more extraordinary to use this absence of evidence as proof that those nomads never existed.

    As has been mentioned, the “red” sea is properly translated from Hebrew as the “reed” sea which suggests something closer to a tidal marsh than open waters. It is not too difficult to imagine how a lightly equipped group on foot could pass successfully through a marsh in low tide and how a wheeled pursuer could become stuck in the mud and engulfed by the tide. Unless, of course, you have preconditioned your mind to automatically abuse everything connected to religious belief.

  9. #9 karl roenfanz ( rosey )
    December 28, 2007

    i remember an article that stated a shallow area that crossed the red sea that could be uncovered with the right wind-tide conditions, thats why they built a lock system around the area.

  10. #10 billadams
    January 6, 2008

    There’s a new theory about Biblical records. catholicfundamentalism.com puts forth the new idea that God can program in three dimensions. He (the Unprogrammed Programmer) used angels (sub-programmers) to program particles, compile them into structures and beings, and had them move throughtime.
    It was easy for His sub-programmers to control the movement of the water they had previously programmed.

  11. #11 Michael
    January 7, 2008

    How much scientific evidence is there to prove that any of us did everything that we actually did on a certain day even 35 years ago, much less 3500?

    If you can’t “prove” something, does that necessarily mean it didn’t happen, even if it seems improbable?

    Here’s a link to an article about recently discovered artifacts that support the history of the Exodus of the Israelites from Egypt: http://www.wnd.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=33168

The site is currently under maintenance and will be back shortly. New comments have been disabled during this time, please check back soon.