Neurophilosophy

Archives for March, 2008

Coming in from the cold

[Introduction|Part 2|Part 3] The study by McKemy et al is of great significance, as it led to the identification and characterization of the first cold receptor. This study also suggests that TRP channels have a general role in thermosensation, as all the previously identified TRP channels are sensitive to heat. Dhaka et al (2007) show…

New neuroscience blogs

Here are a number of new neuroscience blogs that I’ve come across recently: Neuropathology Blog – by Brian E. Moore, an assistant professor in the Department of Pathology at Southern Illinois University’s School of Medicine. This is a welcome addition to the blogosphere, as neuropathology is a dying art (if you’ll excuse the pun). Neuroanthropology…

Hacking the brain

The 40th edition of Encephalon, which is now up at Mind Hacks, includes some excellent entries from the usual suspects. The next edition will be at Pure Pedantry on March 17th. If you’d like to contribute, email permalinks to your neuroscience or psychology blog posts to encephalon{dot}host{at}gmail{dot}com.

Giant neural stem cells in Times Square

(Image: Kymmy Lorrain/BrainCells, Inc.) The two winners of GE Healthcare’s 2007 IN Cell Image Competition will be going on display on the NBC screen in New York City’s Times Square at 7pm on Friday, March 7th and Saturday, March 8th. This confocal image, which won the vote of the scientific panel of judges, shows cultured…

Carl Zimmer interviews Michael Gazzaniga

Gazzaniga is a professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of California in Santa Barbara, and director of the Law and Neuroscience Project. In the 66-minute interview, he discusses, among other things, the use and misuse of neuroimaging data in the courtroom, the ethics of cognitive enhancement, and the pioneering studies of split brain…