Neurophilosophy

Archives for August, 2008

Neuro blogs

Six more new ones: Encefalus Missives from the Frontal Lobe Neuromics NeoCorTEXT Neurospeculation Nothing’s Shocking Plastic, Elastic, the PFC

A place of interest, education & curiosity

Where is this wonderful place? You’re already there! Neurophilosophy gets reviewed for the first time: Neurophilosophy presents a unique opportunity to explore the many facets of the human condition with the guidance of a very well educated tour guide. From cannibalism to athleticism, “molecules, minds and everything in between,” Neurophilosophy offers us a look at…

1960s Ritalin ad

This advertisement for Ritalin comes from a 1966 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Ritalin, or methylphenidate, is widely – and controversially – prescribed to children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. The drug is an amphetamine-like stimulant which blocks reuptake of the neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline (norepinephrine) in the prefrontal cortex.…

In 2000, researchers from the Yale University School of Medicine made a surprising discovery that would start to change the way we think about the causes of depression. Ronald Duman and his colleagues chronically administered different classes of antidepressants to rats, and found that this stimulated the growth of new neurons in the hippocampus. As…

The stream of thought flows on

William James on consciousness and memory: The stream of thought flows on; but most of its segments fall into the bottomless abyss of oblivion. Of some, no memory survives the instant of their passage. Of others, it is confined to a few moments, hours or days. Others, again, leave vestiges which are indestructible, and by…

The notorious Australian bushranger Edward “Ned” Kelly was apprehended in 1878, following a confrontation during which he and his gang killed three policemen. Upon his arrest, Kelly was thus described by the police: 5’10” tall, weight 11st 4lbs, medium build, sallow complexion, dark brown hair, hazel eyes, scar on top of head, two scars on…

Who’s a clever boy then?

Self-recognition was long believed to be unique to humans. However, it was established more than 30 years ago that the great apes are capable of recognizing themselves in the mirror, and more recently it has been found that dolphins and elephants can too. Now Prior et al provide the first evidence of mirror self-recognition in…

Encephalon 52 online now

Encephalon 52 is online now at Ouroboros, and includes entries about grandmother cells, the neurobiology of sleep and the use of transcranial direct current stimulation to improve bad driving.

Last week, I wote about the robot controlled by a “brain” in a culture dish, and in that post, I mentioned that several other groups, including members of the Neuroengineering Lab at Georgia Tech, have been doing similar work. Steve Potter, who leads one of the groups at Georgia Tech’s NeuroLab (and whose work I…

Welcome to your Brain

Earlier this year, Sam Wang kindly sent me a copy of Welcome to Your Brain, the recently published book he has written with Sandra Aamodt. In a note slipped inside the book, he tells me that “We’ve done our best to make it both accessible and informative,” and I think that he and Aamodt have…