Archaeology

Neurophilosophy

Category archives for Archaeology

THIS is the left cerebral hemisphere of an 18-month-old infant who lived some 800 years ago. Such finds are extremely rare, because nervous tissue is soft and normally begins to decompose soon after death, so this specimen is unique in that it has been far better preserved than any other. Although reduced by about 80%…

2,000-year-old fossilized brain

Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000-year-old skull containing what they believe to be the remains of a fossilized brain, while excavating a site at the University of York. Rachel Cubitt, one of the researchers on the dig, felt something moving inside the skull and noticed “an unusual yellow substance” when she peered through an opening in…

(AP Photo/Greek Culture Ministry, HO) This skeleton, exacavated recently in the town of Veria, some 75km west of Thessalonika, provides evidence that the ancient Greeks performed sophisticated neurosurgery. The remains, dated to the 3rd century A.D., belong to a woman aged around 25, who appears to have died as a result of a failed craniotomy…

Tutankhamun’s face revealed

Zahi Hawass (centre), director of the Supreme Council of Egyptian Antiquities, supervises the removal of Tutankhamun’s mummy from his sarcophagus in the underground tomb in the Valley of the Kings in Luxor. (Image: Ben Curtis/ AP)   The face of Tutankhamun has been revealed to the public for the first time. The boy king, who…

Modern art, circa 9000 BC

This wall painting was discovered by a team of French archaeologists working at Djade al-Mughara, a Neolithic site in Northern Syria. The red, black and white painting measures 2 square meters, and has been dated to around 9,000 BC (making it the oldest known wall painting). Team leader Eric Coqueugniot says, “It looks like a…

The cultural destruction of Iraq

Erasing Memory: The Cultural Destruction of Iraq is a 28-minute film from the Archaeology Channel which documents the plundering of Iraqi archaeological sites and looting and destruction of priceless artifacts. This destruction of Iraq’s heritage has been going on since the U.S. invaded the country in March 2003, and continues to this day. The looting…

Most people recognize Tutankhamun as the boy-king of ancient Egypt. He is the most well-known pharaoh because his tomb was discovered apparently intact* and, more importantly, because it contained the magnificent gold mask that has become an icon of Egypt. Tutankhamun was otherwise unremarkable, as was his mother Nefertiti, who is renowned only for her…