Egypt

Neurophilosophy

Category archives for Egypt

Weekend photo

The mosque of Muhammed Ali, with its slender and elegant twin minarets, is one of Cairo’s most prominent landmarks. It is visible in the two photographs of Cairo that I’ve already posted. Muhammed Ali was appointed as the Ottoman Viceroy of Egypt in 1805, by the Sublime Porte. He commissioned this mosque, which was built…

Weekend photo

Another view from the minaret.

Weekend photo

It actually rained very lightly while we were walking along this small beach in Alexandria about three weeks ago. Generally though, the weather in Egypt was warm and sunny – in stark contrast to the wet and windy weather we’re having in London at the moment.

A peek into my week in Egypt

I’m back in London after a hectic – but fantastic – week in Egypt. Of the hundreds of photographs that I took on the trip, this is one of my favourites. It shows part of old Cairo as seen through a peephole in the minaret of a medieval mosque. I’ll be posting more of my…

My language is on the brink of extinction

Coptic leaf from the Gospel of Mark, Egypt, c. AD 500. (Southern Methodist University)  Nearly half of the world’s 7,000 languages are likely to become extinct over the course of this century, according to an article in the NY Times which discusses a recent study of endangered languages. (See this interactive map for more details…

Egyptian blogger identifies his torturer

Abdel Monim Mahmoud, an Egyptian journalist and blogger, has identified (in Arabic and English) a prison officer who allegedly tortured him for 13 days at a state security headquarters back in 2003.  27-year-old Mahmoud is a member of Ikhwan Muslimin (the Muslim Brotherhood, MB). The MB is the world’s first Islamist movement – it was…

A caricature of me

A caricature of me, aged about 4, by Bahgat Osman (1931-2001). Osman was Egypt’s most prominent political cartoonist during the 1960s and ’70s. He was a close friend of my father’s, and I have vivid memories of him from my early childhood in Cairo. I even vaguely remember posing for this portrait, which was completed…

Most people recognize Tutankhamun as the boy-king of ancient Egypt. He is the most well-known pharaoh because his tomb was discovered apparently intact* and, more importantly, because it contained the magnificent gold mask that has become an icon of Egypt. Tutankhamun was otherwise unremarkable, as was his mother Nefertiti, who is renowned only for her…